Friday, September 16, 2005

Return to 70118

The rumors are rampant. The talk is clear. Scott Cowen is making the ultimate claim- we will be back in the spring. It’s hard for some to believe, that New Orleans will be up and running by January. My prediction is that around this time in January, we will be starting our first day of classes. President Bush gave a speech tonight in which he committed unprecedented and unmitigated support for New Orleans. I know that the amount of money and manpower that will be provided to the gulf coast will facilitate a speedy reconstruction. They can make progress in remarkable time if the federal government keeps their promise to support the reconstruction (and they will). The evidence proves my prediction to be pretty accurate.

Thus, Mayor Ray Nagin’s startling announcement that repopulation of New Orleans will begin next week. With so many negative reports from the news media, no one thought that we would be allowed back into the city as soon as next week. More importantly, the Mayor’s decision to allow people back into New Orleans was supported by an important EPA report that said it would pose little risk for people to return, although some of their evidence is still inconclusive. The Times-Picayune reported “on September 22, residents of the 70118 zip code, also Uptown, will be allowed to return.” The French Quarter will be open a week from Monday, also indicating there is significant progress. While the EPA data is still incomplete, there are many signs that point to the fact that the air is clean and the water is not. The water is still leaving a toxic residue in the mud that still must be cleaned. The big question is the drinking water. The water is still not suitable for cooking, drinking or bathing. Nagin claims that two hospitals will be opened for residents to begin receiving healthcare. Entergy claims that power has already been restored in three-fourths of the areas targeted for resettlement. There will be more soon.

The question is: will there be a New Orleans with only Uptown and the French Quarter? Will we be able to go help rebuild the areas that need it the most? How long will it take for those areas to come back?

I’m looking forward to a great spring semester, and that’s final.

127 Comments:

Anonymous concerned tulanian said...

Not to restrain enthusiasm, but please, please be considerate when and how you return.

This is great news that Uptown is being re-opened so soon. Keep in mind, however, that early on at least, the local state of affairs is fragile.

Patience is a virtue. If everybody returns all at once, imagine the strain on services that creates. Just like after or during any emergency situation, if you don't have to, don't.

Waiting a few days or weeks won't matter in the long run. The important thing is to come back, and help the city and campus to restore themselves.

So, if you have no intent to help, don't be a part of the next problem.

5:17 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Since Tulane is in the 70118 zip code, I will be heading to Tulane to retrieve my child's belongings. I know that Mr. Cowen will have access ready for us. Congratuations! We are so ready to see the campus and get our things and get back out, only to return in spring - oh happy day!

5:28 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Reverse osmosis machines in every dorm would be super! It would save lugging drinking water!

5:35 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Has anyone heard anything offical from Tulane about returning to campus to get stuff or is that something that will be addressed in the 5 o'clock chat?

6:26 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

the mayor is opening up that part of town and because Tulane is a business (obviously) they need to open up as well and let the customers come retrieve! If they can get 400 people in there to clean, they can get people in there to let us in!

6:42 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i'm sure students will be able to go back in a few weeks when the area is cleaned up a little more. your stuff isn't going anywhere, there is no rush to go back.

6:50 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Not true. In the meanwhile it can mildew. Also, I would prefer NOT to replace anything that my student will need soon (like jackets, shoes) that may still be okay.

6:55 AM  
Anonymous ncgwmom said...

I am embarrassed by comments lke the one saying Tulane is a business and they should drop the serious business of restoration to allow us in to retrieve things like jackets. My own son has a three thousand dollar computer in danger, but I don't think the archivists and restorationists shoud stop or delay work so I can go pick it up! PLEASE show a little patience. If all Tulane had behaved like was a business, they would never have cared for our sons and daughters the way they did during the evacuation.

7:11 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"If all Tulane had behaved like was a business, they would never have cared for our sons and daughters the way they did during the evacuation."

So wrong, if Cowen had responded like a leader and handled the situation like good leaders do in a crisis, there would be answers and no need for these blogs. A business would have had a plan in place and would not be operating by the seat of their pants. Cowen's handling of this entire situation is an embarrassment to Tulane, higher education and NOLA. The Board of Trustees should be ashamed of themselves for allowing this to occur and to still sit back and let Cowen make misstep after misstep.

7:17 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I hate to inform you (the last poster) but Tulane IS a business as evidenced in their fall tuition policy. And that is fine - but it is a business. The mold and mildew is getting worse by the day, and in order to save myself some more money, I want to retrieve my child's things. My child was displaced just like the other evacuees -why do you think it is different for our children who don't have access to their things and the other people in that area who are going back in to get their things? Just because they are students, doesn't mean they don't need their belongings - no different from anyone else. We are being patient, but that area of town is opening, and I expect Tulane to hire someone to help us in our dorms.

7:19 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Has anyone heard anything offical from Tulane about returning to campus to get stuff or is that something that will be addressed in the 5 o'clock chat?

Yes Tulane is a business in a sense but I think people should be patient and wait for officals to say whether it is safe. Windows were blown and other possiable dangers chill baby!

7:27 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am lucky as fa r as being set up in a private house with a room of my own, but this weekend will be my third one no counting the cajundome. I personally am tired of being moved around.

I wonder where everyone is like my neighbors in 423 of Rosen house Crystal and James who went to baton rouge (email me at crowscaw@rocketmail.com if anyone knows!)

The other thing I am trying to do is set up some kind of computer donation service for students. I am having trouble in my new classes because lack of net services. Any ideas are welcome..send them to my email.

7:40 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm a freshman parent so I do not know the layout of New Orleans at all. Could you help understand me what happened where? Many areas were badly flooded (i.e. houses to be condemned) some were not. In which areas, do most of the Tulane faculty, staff and students live? If their houses, schools, etc. were lost, are there other areas where these people can readily relocate? Any info is appreciated.

7:48 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

They have another week to fix the windows and the other dangers! If the city of New Orleans can let 180,000 people back in in the next week, Tulane can let people in, too. Patience, yes, but accomodating the students in this area should be a priority. For once, in the last few weeks, let the students, who need their things, have priority. No one is asking for historians who are saving the school to let us in the dorms, but security could, or national guard. It just has to be arranged, with the students and their families in mind for once.

7:53 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

officials are saying it is safe to return for those in the 70118 zip code - tulane is in that zip code.

7:55 AM  
Anonymous greenwave said...

i think the cleanup crews want to get rid of some of the downed tree limbs and foliage before opening the campus up to everyone to gather their belongings. they aren't going to want you to be climbing over branches on the ground to get to your clothes and computers.

7:58 AM  
Anonymous greenwave said...

70118 can return next friday i believe. garden district is wednesday. cbd is next monday, and the french quarter is in 2 weeks.

8:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Brett,

My concern is that while all this optimism is wonderful is it realistic? When I consider the number of students and faculty who reside off campus I have to wonder where they will all live. As the water recedes it will leave behind buildings and homes that have been submerged for weeks.
The mold problem there is going to be unbelievable even if the water and air is fine.

From an article http://news.mongabay.com/2005/0906-reuters.html

"The water will leave behind more trouble -- a city filled with mold, some of it toxic, the experts said. After other floods, researchers found many buildings had to be stripped back to concrete, or razed.

"If you have a building half full of water, everything above the water is growing mold. When it dries out, the rest grows mold," Zeliger said. "Most of the buildings will have to be destroyed." "


Do you live off campus?
How many students reside off campus?
I would assume that most faculty live off campus - is this true?
Even Tulane's buildings have been sitting in water.

8:01 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

They have been there all week, they have another week - give me a break! The damage was "minimal". This is ridiculous. Again, if 180,000 people can come into the city, then obviously the debris is cleared or will be cleared by then. Don't tell me Tulane campus can't be cleared in a 2 week period to retrieve things. This is a lame excuse for putting students on the back burner!

8:02 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I've read something coming from Tulane faculty that they may have back-to-back semesters in the spring. Does anyone have further info about this? Is this a two-for-one to make up for the lost fall semester?

8:14 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

hey does anyone know the address of monroe hall. I need it for some paperwork.
thanks tulane freshman

8:17 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

If you are doing FEMA paperwork, you can use 31 McAlister. Do it over the phone, the operators can override problems that the website is experiencing.

8:19 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The university has hired a professional firm that specializes in the restoration and rehabilitation of facilities, including our collections and archives. The firm already has provided more than 400 people to work on our campuses, and their reports are especially encouraging. They report damage that is less than initially anticipated. They have assessed the damage to our buildings, have begun to repair windows, clear away downed foliage and place tarpaulins over any missing roofing tiles.

From tulane.edu

Now, give me a reason that they can't open up a dorm to let you get your things?

8:21 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just think of all that these 400 people can get accomplished by next Thursday!

8:22 AM  
Anonymous concerned tulanian said...

7:48 AM Post, freshman parent. I have found a link from another blog site that shows a layout of the city and flood data. Go to http://pelican83.blogspot.com, look to the right for links.

Many, but not all, of the Tulane faculty and its students live in areas that fared well, with no, or minor flooding, and little wind damage aside from fallen trees. Those with sensitive noses will probably not like the "odor" that prevails.

Unless you emptied your refrigerator prior to evacuation, kept it off and open, you can toss it now. Rotting food and black mold will have made it toxic, and unuseable.

Others have fared far worse. Tulane is working on locating its off-campus students, contacting them, and finding alternative housing. I know this because I have heard from a Dean assigned to this task. I do not envy him in this chore. Relocation will be difficult, and it will take the next several weeks, longer, to put that plan into place.

The burden does not fall equally, no. The Tulane enterprise is made up of people, from all walks of life, living in a variety of situations. Looking at the calandar, I cannot imagine that sweaters can't wait another month, or two. And, if water has dampened your student's clothing, which sounds like a rare or extreme event in the case of campus dorms (unless we are being fibbed to), they are ruined.

A business, sure. In the business, normally, of teaching, and research, and caring for people. The ranters need to switch blog sites, IMO. Join the disaffected, non-constuctive, bitchy doomsayers at http://tulanerealitycheck.blogspot.com/

8:23 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

To the person who posted at 8:02. The plan was that Tulane could be cleaned up in six weeks, not two. While i realize that you are excited about getting your stuff. Why don't you stop and consider that the there is no water, which means no toilets, there may not be electricity, and that the tulane staff just might want to make the campus as safe as possible for us to come down. It seems like everyone is afraid to go for the spring semester, but right now would be just fine. And if your kids stuff is damaged report it to fema. Thats what they are there for.

8:27 AM  
Anonymous yuck said...

When I moved my freshman in, a little over a year ago, I recall several huge trailers full of boxes shipped to Tulane. I wonder what the status of all that stuff is this time around? Yuck?

8:34 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have reported to Fema. Now, I want my kids things. I am not excited about the prospect of going to get his things. I am NEEDING his things, just like the other 180,000 people want to go get their things. I don't need water to pack up our bags. I need electricity simply to get into the door. I'll be there less than 3 hours, just like I was the day that we moved in.

8:37 AM  
Anonymous greenwave said...

thats a great point. you have all of these people talking about how its too dangerous to return for the spring, yet they are dying to get back right now when it is more dangerous than it will be in 4 months. i'm not saying that you shouldn't return for 4 months, but just wait a few weeks so that the infrastructre can be more restored and so the area won't be as hectic.

8:38 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I agree. And to the poster who said the "plan" was for it to be six weeks to clean Tulane, we need a quicker cleaning crew! The dang city of New Orleans is cleaning huge areas of town, with less people, in less time! HA!

8:40 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

If you are not tuned into TD Jakes' sermon at the National Cathedral, you are missing something powerful. I hope there will be a transcript available.

8:42 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i'm pretty sure that the federal government sent more than 400 people to clean the entire city.

8:42 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

PAY ATTENTION: THE MAYOR AND CITY OFFICIALS WILL BE OPENING THE 70118 ZIP CODE NEXT THURSDAY, OBVIOUSLY DEEMING IT SAFE TO RETURN. THEY AREN'T EVEN MAKING PEOPLE LEAVE AGAIN! DON'T TELL ME TULANE CAN'T GET SOME OF THEIR KIDS IN TO RETRIEVE BELONGINGS!

8:42 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

What they are doing is minor cleaning not full restoration.

8:42 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Sure, the city is hiring more than 400, but the space is much larger. Tulane can do this, if they want. And we all know it.

8:44 AM  
Anonymous sc said...

"I need electricity simply to get into the door."

LOL

Somehow I doubt that a lack of electricity will hold you back.

You certainly don't need shock therapy. Vallium maybe.

8:45 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I don't need "full restoration" to go into the dorm and pack. Are you telling me that the policy of this school is that we have to wait till the entire school is restored until we get in our dorms? That is ridiculous.

8:46 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Tulane can do this, if they want."

Right. That would make such perfect sense. Some of you slay me with your comments. Wrong blog. The rant line is
http://tulanerealitycheck.blogspot.com/

8:47 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

If you live in monroe hall you just might need electricity. If you remeber the doors are on a key card access. Most doors of those type close with lack of electricity. I hope this info is wrong but it is worth asking about.

8:48 AM  
Anonymous sc said...

And one wonders how people could have been left in hospitals dying? How people could have been left behind in the Superdome, the Convention Center, the interstate overpasses, nursing homes, etc.

I pray for the slow learners amongst you.

By all means, stomp your feet and scream like two-year-olds.

8:51 AM  
Anonymous greenwave said...

i'm not saying that you have to wait until january to pick up your stuff. i'm saying that you should let the clean up crew and restoration crew do their job before going back. having several hundred families back at once to retrieve their stuff is only going to delay the restoration and cleanup job. like everyone has said, this is a business, and they want to make sure that their doors open as soon as possible. its not just a couple hundred families coming to campus, its a couple hundred cars too, plus you need coordinators, and more security. you will get your stuff back soon, all you have to do is wait a little until the situation calms down a bit.

8:52 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

President Cowen,

Please ask the National Guard to provide extra security to keep manic parents out before they loot the place. Thanks.

8:53 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

here's an idea, all of you "concerned parents" call Nagin and demand him force Cowen to open the campus up so you can get your child's clothes.

8:57 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here is an even better idea:
Call for only certain dorms on certain days. Come up with a plan. How many dorms are there?
You could have Monroe and another open for day 1, and so on. That is a PLAN! GET ONE!

9:14 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just curious. How many dormitories are on the campus?

9:15 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

That is a great idea. Similar to Nagins plan. Open the dorms one or two at a time, assign a day to come in, that will give all the parents time to go get their things. Not just clothes, honey, but all of their belongings. That will make it easier, too, for the cleaning crew to clean and get us ready for spring move in!

9:18 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You will have to show some sort of ID that says you live or work in 70118.

9:28 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Your tulane ID will be fine. Tulane is in 70118.

9:29 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

We are anxious to get into Sharp Hall to get my daughters things and as soon as possible - it isn't just clothes but computer equipment and many other things making her stay at her temporary institution difficult. Why would we not be allowed back in the dorms if the zip code is open? Has President Cowan addressed this at all since it has been announced that people can return to 70118.

10:01 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Something like this is what should have been done in my opinion:

(1) Close school for the fall semester.

(2) Encourage students to make alternative plans. Alternative plans could consist of enrollment in another academic institution, internships as well as volunteering to help in the relief effort. Inform students that numerous schools were offering to open their doors for immediate enrollment and tell them that they should check with each school to determine what if any financial arrangements exist. Inform students that the administration intends to consider some academic credit for volunteer activities.

(3) Inform all students that their fall tuition money would be applied to the next semester. ( no cash refunds - store credit only so to speak) Exceptions would be considered on an individual basis.

(4) Inform students that the book issue would be dealt with when school reopened . Books that had not been damaged would be accepted for an exchange in the Spring ( once again - store credit only)

(5) Ask other schools and universities to donate tuition dollars paid by Tulane students back to Tulane University to the extent practicable.

(6) Inform parents and students that the school would need substantial donations to recover. Ask that each parent donate the amount of tuition saved (if any) back to Tulane in the form of a tax-deductible donation to the school. (This allows each person to look at their individual losses and make adjustments as they see fit. It also makes the donate tax deductible.

(7) Start an immediate fund raising drive and investigate the possibility of aid or loans as necessary. Solicit donations from other Universities, alumuni,corporations etc.

(8) Inform students and faculty of any aid for which they might be eligible.

(9) Set up a number an emergency disaster committees to deal with the issues confronting the school as a result of the hurricane. (Sub-committees on recruiting implications, housing, financial funding, systems recovery, health concerns etc.) Inform the Tulane community that they would be kept informed as to the status of the various issues.

(10) Inform the community that the school is optimistic about opening for the spring but that they will continue to make assessments regarding the opening date and will inform the community, as the picture becomes clearer.

(11)Be accessible to the parents, students, faculty and staff. Maintain phone lines and support to help deal with questions and concerns for the community. Actively enlist the support of the community by tapping into their talents and resources to assist the school in any way possible

10:03 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I didn't pay my student's tuition because it wasn't due until August 31, at which point I had to send her to another school and needed the money to do so. I have also spent over $3K replacing the minimum items she needed to move into a dorm at another university, not to mention I have to pay her room and board there. I couldn't afford to have done either of those things if Tulane had my money. She will simply not be able to return to Tulane for financial reasons if I have to pay last semesters tuition in addition to all the other expenses.

10:10 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ha....all the students ragging on their parents. How many students here paid for all that stuff in their dorm rooms themselves? Anyone? Anyone? (crickets chirping)
Just as I thought. Your parents are not bottomless pits of money for you to waste as you see fit. Get off their back's, they're the ones that are paying the bills and certainly have a stake in this as well. All the students are losing is time.

10:24 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Ha....all the students ragging on their parents. How many students here paid for all that stuff in their dorm rooms themselves? Anyone? Anyone? (crickets chirping)
Just as I thought. Your parents are not bottomless pits of money for you to waste as you see fit. Get off their back's, they're the ones that are paying the bills and certainly have a stake in this as well. All the students are losing is time.


There aren't any jobs out there anyway so what's the rush ?

10:27 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

http://www.realestatejournal.com/buysell/regionalnews/20050907-corkery.htm
New Orleans Braces
For Mold, Fungi and Decay

"The Wood Association says decay can set in after the water recedes and fungi start to breed. It is imperative to dry out a flooded house quickly, but that could prove difficult in the heat and humidity of Louisiana"

10:33 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

10:27 - I don't understand what a job has to do w/getting items out of the dorms? The parent was simply stating that the STUDENT who is belittling the parents who want their kids belongings probably didn't pay for what is in their dorm room (I know, I know, some do) but that the parent has a financial stake in this, and if the parent wants to get the items, it is Tulane's job to open the dorms. "What's the hurry"? Ask the other thousands of people that want to get back to their possessions as well. Why question the fact that these parents want in the dorms? Is anyone asking the other evacuated people of NO, "what is your hurry?" Of course not. These students who were displaced are no different than any other displaced people in New Orleans, and their parents, typically, pay their bills, so you have no right to question or be disrepectful to any parent that wants a plan for recovering their children's belongings. What those belongings are, and how "valuable" YOU see them, is not the issue.

10:45 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I just saw this post http://www.blogger.com/comment.g?blogID=16312349&postID=112585241079144922



ktopor said...
i spoke with someone on the hotline yesterday. I asked what could be done to make up for the credits that my son does not get this semester since he is part time at school. Here was the solution: He should volunteer his time (work for free) and he would be given Tulane credit for his service hours. (At a cost of around $1,000.00 per credit to me.)
Why don't I just give them $128,000.00 and they can just give him the diploma. That way he won't have to ever take any classes. Somehow this smells like credits for sale.

11:42 AM


I can't believe this! I've lost all respect for this school. This is a total disgrace. Next they will be offering credits to students who write an essay about what they saw on the news regarding the hurricane. $1000.00 a credit - anyone ? anyone ? ferris?

10:45 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Except for in Irby and Phelps which are raised up a few feet, none of the dorms are located on the first floor. Flooding and mildew shouldn't be more of a problem than usual, unless a window was broken or something. If people can leave their belongings in the dorms for a month over Winter Break, another week or so while the school gets a plan for shuttling people in and out of their dorms won't kill your sweaters or anything.

Remember that the RAs, student athletes, and ROTC all play a HUGE role in moving students into residence halls, and without that resource of willing volunteers, it's going to be a lot harder and more chaotic to organize.

There's one thing I don't understand though. Who would honestly leave something as expensive as a computer behind when you evacuate? If it's a bad enough storm to evacuate, it's a bad enough storm to take such valuable belongings with you.

10:47 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

My student qualifies for the HOPE scholarship in Georgia, which means she can go to any public state insitution and the State of Georgia pays her tuition. She earned this in high school and we are now taking advantage of it. I doubt the state of Georgia is going to fork over the tuition money to Tulane - and we certainly aren't considering the cost is 1/5 the cost of Tulane and she could only get 14 hours. It's simple math which will decide if she returns to Tulane. It was already an incredible financial stretch to get her there - and after the recent costs of Katrina to our family she will not return if they insist we pay the full tuition this semester.

10:48 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Who are you people that think Uptown is opening up just for you and your son/daughter to get into dorms? Entire families have been without homes. They've been living in shelters, paying for hotels, or squatting with friends and families for weeks. Give them a chance to go back into their neighborhoods and assess damage to their houses before a stream of angry, whining Tulane parents into the area.

A couple more days locked in a secure dorm room, all of which are off the first floor, isn't going to do anymore damage. Chill out.

10:52 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

To 10:47 - the freshman were expressly told not to bring anything valuable with them because they were sleeping on a gym floor and there belongings couldn't be secured. My freshman didn't know one single person on the bus so it's not as if she had a friend to watch her things. At that time they were told they were returning Wednesday, and to only bring what they could carry on their laps. Almost EVERYTHING she owns is in that room.

10:52 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

from nola.com
Times-Picayune photos
"Inventory of the damage"
TU photos 13-20
http://www.nola.com/katrinaphotos/tp/gallery.ssf?cgi-bin/view_gallery.cgi/nola/view_gallery.ata?g_id=3944

10:55 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

To the 10:45 post:
I think it's pretty fair for Tulane to ask an unreasonable price for a completely unreasonable request..
It's ridiculous that someone would VOLUNTEER and expect to receive something out of it. That defeats the purpose!!
If you go to school part time, you'll get those credits transferred to Tulane. If you wanted more credits, take more classes. OBVIOUSLY.

10:56 AM  
Blogger es said...

"ktopor said...
i spoke with someone on the hotline yesterday. I asked what could be done to make up for the credits that my son does not get this semester since he is part time at school. Here was the solution: He should volunteer his time (work for free) and he would be given Tulane credit for his service hours. (At a cost of around $1,000.00 per credit to me.)
Why don't I just give them $128,000.00 and they can just give him the diploma. That way he won't have to ever take any classes. Somehow this smells like credits for sale."

The above post was also posted on www.pelican83.blogspot.com

The poster was given the opportunity to validate its authenticity, and did NOT do so.

I'd say that about sums up the credibility of the post.

Facts, people. Facts.

11:03 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Someone mentioned that the students who evacuated nola were no different from any other resident.
That's the most obscene comment I've read in a while.
Minus a few exceptions, the majority of students had families and homes out of the affected area to return to, even if they had gone to JSU at first. They have homes and beds and parents who still have jobs.
Tell me how that's the same as losing all your home, your job, your neighbors, and even your family.

11:04 AM  
Anonymous scorekeeper said...

Looks to me like President Cowen did all but number 6. 91% isn't an A, but it's darn close.

11:08 AM  
Anonymous referee said...

probably the same dope who asked rising junior from east of no if they expected a cookie...

some people are just ignorant, and don't know it.

11:10 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

at 10:47 AM anonymous said :

There's one thing I don't understand though. Who would honestly leave something as expensive as a computer behind when you evacuate? If it's a bad enough storm to evacuate, it's a bad enough storm to take such valuable belongings with you.

That's the problem here - a bunch of people who can't think beyond their own situation! Life is not black and white ! Yeah , how could those idiots have left something so important behind? They deserve what they got - come on people THINK about someone else besides yourself. Some people don't have laptops, some left in cars with groups of friends, they left in a hurry because life is more important than your stuff. You take what you need for a few days and you take PEOPLE. However, now you need your stuff - not so hard to undertand.

11:12 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Don't tell me to chill out, you smart aleck kid (whose things were paid for by your parent!)

11:32 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The reference to the students being no different than the other evacuees was not in terms of things lost, but in terms of the DESIRE and NEED to get thier belongings back. Of course, alot of people in NO have it worse.

11:37 AM  
Anonymous pt barnum said...

MSNBC reports:

I" am duty-bound to report the talk of the New Orleans warehouse district last night: there was rejoicing (well, there would have been without the curfew, but the few people I saw on the streets were excited) when the power came back on for blocks on end. Kevin Tibbles was positively jubilant on the live update edition of Nightly News that we fed to the West Coast. The mini-mart, long ago cleaned out by looters, was nonetheless bathed in light, including the empty, roped-off gas pumps. The motorcade route through the district was partially lit no more than 30 minutes before POTUS drove through. And yet last night, no more than an hour after the President departed, the lights went out. The entire area was plunged into total darkness again, to audible groans. It's enough to make some of the folks here who witnessed it... jump to certain conclusions."

"It is impossible to over-emphasize the extent to which this area is under government occupation, and portions of it under government-enforced lockdown. Police cars rule the streets. They (along with Humvees, ambulances, fire apparatus, FEMA trucks and all official-looking SUVs) are generally not stopped at checkpoints and roadblocks. All other vehicles are subject to long lines and snap judgments and must PROVE they have vital business inside the vast roped-off regions here. If we did not have the services of an off-duty law enforcement officer, we could not do our jobs in the course of a work day and get back in time to put together the broadcast and get on the air. As we are about to do."

Is it all a charade?

11:46 AM  
Anonymous dad in virginia said...

Chill out, from a parent who probably paid more than you, but is clearly better medicated!

11:48 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ha Dad! You don't tell me to chill out either unless you want to share your meds!

12:07 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"Facts, people. Facts."

es, you're a genius. I've seen so much hysteria being fed by self described experts. It's hard to get the facts.

To the parents who have stated that they have spent money getting their kids into other schools: Take your situation to the people at Tulane. Yours is one of the thousands of individual situations that will be looked at in the next couple of months. I see lots of angry threats, but have you actually talked to them yet?

I won't be home for the live chat this afternoon, but I'm hoping that some of these questions will be asked. It's less than three hours away, but angry bloggers are already assuming that Tulane will do nothing because they don't care. I'm betting that they are working on a plan now that you will hear at five. After all, Nagin just announced the return yesterday.

If you missed the prayer service at the National Cathedral today, perhaps CSPAN will have a replay. It certainly had its inspirational moments and put things in perspective for me.

12:17 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I agree with 11:08. I think many, if not all, of the items on the 10:03 AM list were done. But it is still funny to me that the items listed are all student/parent priorities. Not on the list: coordinate rescue for Tulane employees still in NOLA (i.e. Tulane medical school, hospital, etc), restore IT system so faculty can continue to receive paychecks, verify location of faculty to assist in finding temporary office space, work to save valuable research assets of faculty. Actually not one of these appears. But addressing textbook refunds-- now that IS important. Tulane has LOTS of constituencies, parents and students are an important one, but not the only one. The leadership challenge here is setting priorities that ultimately will not 100% satisfy any group, but are nevertheless in the best long-term interest of the institution as a whole.

1:01 PM  
Anonymous dad in virginia said...

Take two aspirin, like I did. Then call your doctor in the morning.

1:21 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

http://tulaneinexile.blogspot.com

Similar to this site, brand new. Check it out!

1:29 PM  
Anonymous Jenell-freshman said...

Ok, so to all of you parents out there who are complaining about paying their kids tuition and so on and so forth, there are some kids out there(referring to myself) that have had to apply for student loans, gov't financial aid and had to get a job just to pay for plane tickets to go to Tulane. My parents didn't even get granted a PLUS loan. You can just chill in the fact of getting your kid their clothes back. I had to evacuate to Mississippi with 5 days of clothing. If I can deal in Baltimore, Maryland, where I do not live, then your child can live another 2 weeks until they figure out we are going to be able to get all of our stuff out of our dorms.

To the commentor on the storm being bad enough to evacuate and that means you should take your computer, a lot of students had desktops and those are not as easily evacuated as a laptop, so stop getting annoyed with people worried about their computers.

This situation has caused some great panic amongst everyone, but why don't we all just calm down think rationally for once. things will work out and life could be worse, your kid could have been left at school like the 400 students at Xavier, ok...so it isn't that bad

1:32 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anyone relying on the EPA's information as to whether it's safe to live there or not, better read this;
http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/16/national/nationalspecial/16enviro.html

Remember, the Bush Administration has little use for Science, they're more a "faith based" organization.

1:55 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I wonder, is the opening of Tulane more important than the return of native New Orleanians? Maybe homeless natives could be housed in the college dorms until these people (mostly black and poor) are provided permanent housing. Why not have Tulane open on a limited basis in January, maybe for students who are commuters or have alternate housing. This would help the poor and allow Tulane to improve their image.

2:18 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Jenell,
good for you, you sound like a remarkable young woman who realizes the value of a dollar and are making it on your own.
You haven't had a chance to be on Campus much or meet many people, but I assure you, you are the exception, not the rule.

2:22 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
I agree with 11:08. I think many, if not all, of the items on the 10:03 AM list were done. But it is still funny to me that the items listed are all student/parent priorities. Not on the list: coordinate rescue for Tulane employees still in NOLA (i.e. Tulane medical school, hospital, etc), restore IT system so faculty can continue to receive paychecks, verify location of faculty to assist in finding temporary office space, work to save valuable research assets of faculty. Actually not one of these appears. But addressing textbook refunds-- now that IS important. Tulane has LOTS of constituencies, parents and students are an important one, but not the only one. The leadership challenge here is setting priorities that ultimately will not 100% satisfy any group, but are nevertheless in the best long-term interest of the institution as a whole.

My list was only intended to deal with the issues being debated on this board. I can't believe that anyone would say that the issues were all done except for one. I have to wonder if you are just here to cheerlead the administration or if you are really open an intelligent discussion of the facts.

I can't believe I am doing this because I don't think that you really care what anyone says but here goes:

(1) Point 1 - he did cancel school but it was done too late. He exercised poor judgment in remaining on campus for 5 days. It was apparent to most parents, students and other schools that there would not be a fall semester but we heard nothing from Cowen. We all sat waiting and reading his letters while he kept telling us nothing. This was a status 5 hurricane - why did he place himself in this situation?

(2) He did inform us about the other schools but it was done too late. Many of us had already made arrangements with other schools. President's Letter - September 2nd: Since arriving in Houston about twelve hours ago, I have learned that there has been an outpouring of support and assistance from universities and colleges across the country. They are reaching out to help our students and university in all possible ways. I am deeply appreciative of these efforts during this time of tragedy.

(3) Did not announce that tuition money would be applied to the Spring instead came up with the tuition scam, undoing the outpouring of support and assistance that he mentioned in item 2 above.
(4) Has not said that books can be returned or exchanged. In the chat last week this was said :

Blue: I bought all of my freshman books and left them in my dorm. Am I going to be able to get a refund? I'm off to Middlebury tomorrow but hope to be home in New Orleans soon.
President Cowen: Unfortunately, we do not have the information at this time to answer this question. We do not have regular access to the campus ourselves and we will determine the appropriate way to handle the refund after we know the facts and circumstances of your case.

(5) Ask other schools and universities to donate tuition dollars paid by Tulane students back to Tulane University to the extent practicable. This did not happen either. The schools will collect their tuition - for example if you are at a state school the state school will bill you their normal tuition (be it $3,000.00 or $12,000.00). They will retain that tuition. Tulane will benefit from the differential. For schools that have agreed to free tuition yes, Tulane will benefit from the entire amount but this is not the case at any state school since they are legally required to charge tuition. In general the current students are being asked to foot the bill for all of this. There is no loan, no use of the endowment funds - its all coming out of us.

(6) Inform parents and students that the school will need substantial donations to recover. Ask that each parent donate the amount of tuition saved (if any) back to Tulane in the form of a tax-deductible donation to the school. (This allows each person to look at their individual losses and make adjustments as they see fit) . Not done - no tax-deductible donation. Just a forced donation to the school - take it or leave - literally.

(7)Start an immediate fund raising drive and investigate the possibility of aid or loans as necessary- I am not talking about putting a link on a website and hoping that a lot of angry parents who feel that they are being strong armed are going to donate. I was envisioning a formal fund- raising effort. I haven't heard him address loans or federal aid either.

(8) Inform students and faculty of any aid that they might be eligible for. If he's done this I would love to know where. Could you please provide me with a link?

(9) Set up a number an emergency disaster committees to deal with the issues confronting the school as a result of the hurricane. (Sub-committees on recruiting implications, housing, financial funding, systems recovery, health concerns etc.) Inform the Tulane community that they would be kept informed as to the status of the various issues. He's probably done some of this but we haven't heard much about it nor do we know if he's addressing things like health concerns. Whatever he's done we have not been properly informed.

(10)Inform the community that the school is optimistic about opening for the spring but that they will continue to make assessments regarding the opening date and will inform the community, as the picture becomes clearer. NOT DONE. "Tulane's president, working 350 miles from the campus, says reopening by spring is essential " This is one of my biggest concerns.



(11)Be accessible to the parents, students, faculty and staff. Maintain phone lines and support to help deal with questions and concerns for the community. Actively enlist the support of the community by tapping into their talents and resources to assist the school in any way possible. NOT DONE. This administration has been inaccessible.

2:29 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The person I spoke to at the call center today said that angry parents had been calling for days.

2:51 PM  
Anonymous greenwave said...

just because you haven't heard about it, doesn't mean that its not happening. i'm pretty sure cowen is looking into health concerns on the campus. i'm pretty sure that he is also trying to raise a lot of money. he has said that he is optimistic about the campus opening in the spring and has talked about the cleanup process that is currently going on at the campus.

2:53 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i feel bad for the people working the call center. i'm sure it has been brutal the past few days with the ranters.

2:54 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i think that was a very informative chat. he actually answered a lot of good questions.

4:03 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I lost my connection during the chat for a minute. Does anyone know if he addressed the issue of having to pay both the host school and the Tulane tuition -- if you have not yet paid Tulane ?

4:05 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

It was a good chat and it was a very different President we saw today. Sounds like they are reevaluating some policies - perhaps as a result of the response they have been getting at the call center and all the people planning on withdrawing.

4:07 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

yeah he said pay both and then they will credit the extra tuition from the host university to your spring semester

4:08 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

He is going to be on NBC Nightly News tomorrow night.

I thought it was good how he was slipping some humor in there as well.

The food will be as good as it was in the past line was classic

4:09 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

To 1:55 pm

Most of the organizations helping these evacuees are "faith based". Our local ministry is serving over 10,000 meals a day, taking off work and time away from their families to help these people. Don't let the NY Times be your Bible.

4:49 PM  
Anonymous Laura said...

You know...I worked at a psychiatrist's office for a few months, and I honestly believe a few of these parents need to see a therapist, or perhaps eve a psychiatrist for some evaluation. 8,000+ of us are all in similar positions here. Everything I own is in a dorm, but you know what? Material items aren't everything. And yes, I did in fact pay for over $1,000 worth of the stuff sitting at Tulane with my own hard work. To everyone out there who is so concerned about getting back-- take a few deep breaths, what are you so concerned about? Life will go on. We'll get to go back when we can, if there's stuff there...great, if not, we're still better off then most people affected by Katrina anyways. So please, everyone, relax, slow down. Things happen for a reason, maybe we should all try to learn a little something from this disaster.

4:51 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

http://tulaneinexile.blogspot.com
Go to this website, it has updated photos as of yesterday of the campus. I think it is worse than we have been led to believe, and as far as being relaxed about our children's things that are in those dorms - some of us can't afford to replace them so yes, it is a consideration. Some of us can't afford to pay Tulane tuition and additional tuition so again, it's not a matter of choice or attitude.

5:09 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I understand that Dr. Cowan is determined to get the university up and running by spring semester, which is in his mind in its best interest.
However, it seems to me that if the experience for students and faculty is sub-par (which it might very well be—the mayor spoke yesterday of a “semi-normal existence” for returning residents), the school’s reputation may suffer more in the long run than if he waited until the next fall to reopen fully.
Additionally, I have grave concerns about the long term as well as short term health risks in New Orleans. Not every student has an equal health status. Some students have asthma, immune system disorders, or other sensitivities to environmental pollutants (mold, mildew, chemicals, bacteria, etc). I have reread articles about Love Canal, remembering reduced fertility and odd immune system diseases/cancers that showed up years later and were correlated to toxins in the environment. This is a serious issue here, one that each parent has to consider based on his/her own judgment and an individual willingness to assume risks.
However small, these risks will be different and greater than we assumed when we enrolled our children in college in New Orleans.
Last, there is the issue of psychological stress that these students have gone through. Many, if not most students, will be eager to return. But others have stepped back from the school, perhaps from fears, perhaps from financial issues, like a year-long lease in another city, etc. Students have differing degrees of emotional resiliency----facing difficult situations and multiple moves and readjustments. No one wants to see mental or emotional health problems develop in our student body.
For these reasons, I believe that the residency requirement should be OPTIONALLY WAIVED for ONE MORE SEMESTER. If indeed the school opens in January 2006, most students will probably return. But I believe students who wish to continue as visitors at other schools should also be able to be awarded Tulane degree credits for spring semester if they choose. I understand that many universities are willing to consider giving Tulane the tuition again for that single extended period.
I believe that by fall, 2006, all students should again be required to attend in New Orleans as per “pre-Katrina”.
As you consider this idea, please remember that a school exists to serve the best interests of its students. These interests are not all the same. Therefore, in these unusual circumstances, students should be given OPTIONS for spring 2006. It would be a reasoned, measured gesture of caring for students as individuals that would both promote good will in the Tulane community of parents and students and the health of the university.

5:53 PM  
Anonymous following up said...

I agree with the 5:53 post. I'd add, however, that from a finacial point of view, it is only feasable if Tulane continues to charge full tuition -- not a well received proposition, but one that should be considered.

6:55 PM  
Anonymous rhymin simon said...

"I can't believe that anyone would say that the issues were all done except for one. I have to wonder if you are just here to cheerlead the administration or if you are really open an intelligent discussion of the facts."

Discussion? Or debate? Facts? Or opinions?

To quote a songwriter: "One man's ceiling is another man's floor."

7:00 PM  
Anonymous sc said...

1) did...but
2) did...but
3) did...but
4) did...but
5) wrong...UVA is a state school, and I know of others, and Governor Warner mandated that state institutions NOT charge tuition to these special case students. Even the grad business, med, and law schools are adhering to his request. I cannot speak to all cases, just what I know to be a fact. (Try the same yourself.)
6) didn't...yet
7) did
8) did...but
9) did
10) did...read much?
11) did...but

With hysterical parents clogging the lines to rant without understanding the realities and facts of the situation, intent on demonstrating their ignorance and child-like impudence, it is a wonder any progress can be made.

That's not cheerleading. I don't like Cowen. I don't like their tuition policy. I don't like the situation. I don't like the response. But if you are not part of the solution, get out of the way. And stick to the facts...

7:12 PM  
Anonymous mom teresa said...

"Most of the organizations helping these evacuees are "faith based". Our local ministry is serving over 10,000 meals a day, taking off work and time away from their families to help these people. Don't let the NY Times be your Bible."

Ditto that. It's not the media, or the NY Times, or FEMA, or even the Red Cross, that is making a difference thus far. Don't take my word for it. Listen to the people on the front line. Who do you see? Lutherans, Presbyterians, Methodists, Baptists, and Good Samaritans of ALL faiths helping their fellow man. While a few hypocrites blog their complaints. If CNN is your view of Katrina, you need to get of your duff.

7:20 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i looked at those pictures and it is pretty much what scott cowen said. some buildings had some flooding, there was some wind damage, and a lot of branches down. nothing too devastating, and nothing that can't be cleaned up in the next few months. we didn't see any major structural damage, just cosmetic.

quit trying to make it sound like the campus should be razed. if your so upset for some reason than leave. no one wants to hear negativity especially in a time like this and you are doing a disservice to your fellow greenwave members by giving misleading information.

8:27 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I will be in New Orleans and I will go by campus and I will check out the work and the area and report back! Is this guy telling us that we can't have access to our things until all repairs are done? BS

9:29 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

http://www.kodakgallery.com/PhotoView.jsp?&collid=65956250309&photoid=55956250309


Well, now I "see" what the mess is all about! Wish I'd had this pics before I spoke too soon. Looks like a big, molded mess to me. I'm not sure I want my kid's stuff back! YUK! GOOD LUCK GETTING THIS READY FOR SPRING!!!!!!

9:57 PM  
Anonymous TulaneMom said...

We went down to the Red Cross today to ask about the debit card program posted here a while ago. They don't have any cards, although they were pleasant and took my son's information. They gave him a handy dandy toiletry bag though. Like other students, mine left all the clothes, books, computer etc., at school. I can't afford to replace it all. The insurance won't consider the claim, since we can't prove the items have been destroyed. FEMA won't offer one of their supposed debit cards, unless my son's condition becomes more "dire", and the Red Cross is taking many names, but at this point, has no cards to distribute.

NorthWest is the only airline flying into the city and tickets start at 400 each way. There are limited highway routes left that go into the city. The city says it is open, but there is really no water, no sewer and minimum medical care. I have heard from family members of the utility workers that there are still some snipers in some regions. Can you really call it a city when the basic social services are not being provided?

But, most of these agencies designed to help, all assume we can all get in and retrieve our things, and that the items are simply in storage, until we can prove otherwise. Actually, I'm not sure I would want to bring any of that mold back here. If there was any chance we'd port along a few spores of whatever is growing down there, it would be to great a risk.

I concur with concerns about long term health risks. I'd like to see the EPA reports in detail. I'd like to know what we're up against. I'd like to know that the levee patches have been tested and what kind of storm they could withstand now? Will they break in the next big rain storm? What about the normal rainy season in New Orleans. Anyone that lives there knows those pumps fail in heavy rains and the streets can start to flood. What assurance are we getting that preparations would be made for future emergencies? There may not be several days notice of future levee breaks.

I have a lot more questions than answers. So, for now I'm taking Nagin and Cowen's comments with a grain of salt. Let's remember, Nagin didn't order the evacuation until the final hours, and wasn't prepared to move his people out of the city. Do I trust his word on whether it is safe to return?

10:25 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

does anyone know if UNO is okay?

11:45 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The only problem w/ the ideas about having different days for different dorm retrieval is that a huge group of people (myself included) would only be able to go on the weekends. My mom cant easily take a couple of days off to go get my stuff, b/c she used a big portion of her vacation time moving me down the first time. Also i'm getting a job for this semester, so I cant easily just demand several days off right after i start. If they had different weekends it might work tho, like over the course of 2 or 3 weeks.

12:45 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The TU site says that they're not letting anyone in until the whole place is secured. It does make sense, though - while you could use a TU ID for access, pretty much anyone can come along in your car. It's funny that all the parents who were freaking about the possibility of looters in previous postings are now screaming for the campus to pretty much open its arms for such looters to show up. And 'the one or two dorms open a day' schedule is not feasible, even if we could all get there on each day and somehow empty the whole dorm out in 24 hours. In Mo, for example, where I used to live, since all the keycard doors lock upon closing, everyone uses their deadbolt to keep it open for convenience if they're moving stuff in and out. Can you imagine adequately policing twelve floors of mostly open doors with freshman families dragging crap up and down the building all day without help from the RAs and such?

1:02 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

anonymous said :

I have a lot more questions than answers. So, for now I'm taking Nagin and Cowen's comments with a grain of salt. Let's remember, Nagin didn't order the evacuation until the final hours, and wasn't prepared to move his people out of the city. Do I trust his word on whether it is safe to return?

Yes, and his family is living safely in Texas.

8:19 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am a Freshman parent and also the parent of a homeowner in the 70118 zip code - whose home did not flood. Even as of today, they are not allowing her back into her home-she was forcibly turned away last Sat. by armed soldiers and Mayor Nagin is not yet allowing the homeowners from that zip code back in yet. Tulane has not given us a date when we can enter the dorms and I,too want to retrieve my child's belongings but know that we cannot safely or legally enter that part of town yet.

70118 may be allowed back in beginning this Wed. or Fri - but only homeowners-with proof-and those dates have changed from his (Nagin's) first announcement.

Did anyone ask President Cowen questions about retrieval of possessions during the Friday's live chat?

By the way, mold has not occurred at all in my daughter's home-no windows broke and so there was no water damage. Only if your child's dorm room had water damage should there be any mold problem.

1:42 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just because you can't see the mold doesn't mean it doesn't exist. If it has in any way established a foothold within the structure, anywhere, there is a risk. Not all mold is toxic.
Entire buildings have had to be torn down where toxic mold has gained a foothold in the sub-structure. I'm not trying to alarm anyone, but sometimes what you don't see can be harmful as well. Just be careful, that's all.

3:04 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Everything you always wanted to know about mold but were afraid to ask :

http://mold-help.org/content/view/478/

an entire website devoted to mold

One paragraph :
Mold has certainly made it's way into people's homes as well as the headlines recently. Many people still don't fully understand the health hazards of fungal exposure. The term toxic mold is somewhat misleading as it connotates an idea that certain molds are toxic, when actually certain types of molds produce secondary metabolites that produce toxins. The correct term is mycotoxins. Airborne mycotoxins from can definitely destroy one's health. Sometimes, people are unaware that they are breathing mold spores and mycotoxins until they are very sick. Certain people have a minor allergic reactions to the non-toxic mold, but once you leave the affected area they most likely recover with few serious side effects. However, if they have been exposed to the dangerous molds such as Stachybotrys or Chaetomium, they could suffer from a myriad of serious symptoms and illnesses such as chronic bronchitis, learning disabilities, mental deficiencies, heart problems, cancer, multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue, lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple chemical sensitivity, bleeding lungs and much more.

3:30 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here are some proven facts about mold and flood/hurricane victims-



FACT-



Among any surfaces, water infiltration can induce mold to proliferate within 24 to 48 hours.


Although most fungi is harmless, many modern household molds cause mycotoxins, which have been proven to cause permanent neurological, psychological, pathological, and immunological damage.


Many indoor molds are known causative carcinogens, and combined with ideal breeding conditions, can lead to cancer and several types of autoimmune disease in record time.


Exposure to toxigenic molds can cause death in extreme cases, even among the healthiest individuals, despite false claims that say only certain individuals with impaired immune systems are at risk.


The United States government has failed to designate any programs to assist the public with this epidemic and they ignore every plea for help due to the real problem at hand; high costs and an easy cover-up as many feign ignorance. Additionally, they have hired outside unscrupulous consultants to provide cock-eyed evidence to dissuade the public from the true evidence in hopes that the ignorance of people United States will ignore the truth. However, according to Dr. Aristo Vojdani, over 40 million have been affected already, and now fungal exposure is a national health crisis with epidemic proportions.


Any ground that has been supporting a structure containing these molds is also toxic, and digging down at least two meters to rebuild can alleviate many of these potential problems.


Common symptoms associated with mycotoxin-causing fungal exposure are similar to other forms of poisoning, which include: acid reflux, brain fog, asthma-type symptoms, rashes, easy-bruising, dizziness, short-term memory, and balance problems (more symptoms listed here).


Trying to salvage precious mementos, antiques, artwork and family heirlooms can be one of the worst things that these struggling victims do. Although it can quite cathartic for many flood or hurricane victims to try and save old memories or significant pieces, the chance of fungal growth is more than 99%. Without proper containment, ozone, proven antimicrobials and UV light, it is almost impossible to “clean” items effectively and with the addition of someone who has been compromised with fungal exposure, the chances of cross-contamination are very high. There has even been a record number of otherwise healthy plaintiff attorneys lately who have died from fungal exposure just through papers brought into.


Most hurricane victims are very understandably angered by the fact that an organization who would actually do real “good faith efforts” towards these citizens would finish their rescue efforts and burn the disease ridden areas or assist in proactive relief efforts, rather than leave the unspeakable problem of remediating or abandoning and paying for homes that are unhealthy to occupy. But once again, the burden of the problem is left in the hands of innocent consumers so big corporations such as the mortgage industry can have it both ways, profit, profit, profit. Meanwhile, many sick families are burdened with the ordeal of living with sick, moldy houses, and deciding between living homeless and healthy or dying in their “dream homes.”


This attitude of hurricane victims of crying such phrases such as, How can this [injustice] happen in America? According to the hundreds of thousands of mold victims who lose their homes on a daily basis throughout the United States, frantically ask this question as they lose their homes and health to mold everyday, but no one listens to them either. This is America, a country with leadership who appears to care nothing about the average person. There is no more freedom here than any third world country, as this is what will be happening here soon, no rights for citizens as major corporations take our rights away every day. You will see some major examples, and repercussions of this within 18 months, to be perfectly accurate, according to some new legislation that will be altering thousands of people and their inalienable rights firsthand. It is no coincidence that Halliburton will be controlling the rebuilding of these new cities, who will now become oil refinery sites due to mass foreclosures and loss of properties.

3:43 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here's some interesting and hopefully helpful information from the 9/16/05 No Child Left Behind newsletter from a Ed.gov list server.
----
NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND
EXTRA CREDIT
September 16, 2005

NEW SUPPORT FOR FAMILIES AND AREAS AFFECTED BY HURRICANE KATRINA

10:05 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Emergency Support for Affected Colleges and Universities and Relief for Impacted Students. To help colleges and universities, including community colleges, in the severely damaged areas resume operations quickly and effectively, colleges and universities that have temporarily ceased operations would be able to retain student aid already received for the new academic year. In addition, students would be relieved of any obligation to repay the federal aid that they received for the current term at these colleges and universities that have temporarily ceased operations.

10:06 AM  
Blogger Freshman parent said...

Dosn't everyone realize that this was a NATIONAL UNPRECIDENTED DISASTER...what do you expect from Tulane. They are doing the best they can...leave them alone and let them do their job! Your kids will get there stuff back and if not FEMA or your homeowners policy will take care of it! At least they aRE ALIVE!

10:17 AM  
Blogger perturbed said...

Mike Brown was doing the best job he could too. But that doesn't mean he was doing a good job and should not have been fired

2:25 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the least of NOLA's worries right now is letting Tulane students get their stuff back. The city has gone through so much devastation, is it really necessary to be this frantic about getting your stuff back? There are people sick, without homes, and missing family members and friends. I am a Tulane student and yes I would love to get my stuff(including $3000 computer) back too but please be patient and show some compassion...

7:37 AM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

At 5:53 PM Anonymous said:

"For these reasons, I believe that the residency requirement should be OPTIONALLY WAIVED for ONE MORE SEMESTER. If indeed the school opens in January 2006, most students will probably return. But I believe students who wish to continue as visitors at other schools should also be able to be awarded Tulane degree credits for spring semester if they choose. I understand that many universities are willing to consider giving Tulane the tuition again for that single extended period.
I believe that by fall, 2006, all students should again be required to attend in New Orleans as per “pre-Katrina”.
As you consider this idea, please remember that a school exists to serve the best interests of its students. These interests are not all the same. Therefore, in these unusual circumstances, students should be given OPTIONS for spring 2006. It would be a reasoned, measured gesture of caring for students as individuals that would both promote good will in the Tulane community of parents and students and the health of the university."


A very good analysis of the situation. It also echos the concerns on my mind and other parents minds. In all, a very good suggestion.

I could see Cowen allowing us to do this, but still charging us Tulane tuition while the kids are still taking classes at State U.

2:04 PM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

At 8:27 PM Anonymous said:

"quit trying to make it sound like the campus should be razed. if your so upset for some reason than leave. no one wants to hear negativity especially in a time like this and you are doing a disservice to your fellow greenwave members by giving misleading information."

The campus actually looks very good. Its the rest of the city the should be razed. Hopefully the projects are uninhabitable and will need to be destroyed! :-)

BTW, this poster is well into 'Anger'.

2:09 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Who wrote that the school exists to serve the best interests of the students? This is completely untrue. The school exists to employ faculty and administration, to assist Cowen to look good in this crisis and help any administrator build his/her resume to move on.

8:42 PM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

I guess the subject of this entry in the blog has been put on hold! :-(

From nola.com:
Mayor Ray Nagin suspended plans to let Uptowners return later this week and asked Algiers residents, who were allowed to come back to their homes Monday, to evacuate.

I'm wondering if Brett is going to comment on this.

5:40 AM  
Blogger job opportunitya said...

I surf the web looking for blogs like this one.
Your site was on point and will be back again! Awesome
blog.
If your look to uncover information, please visit my federal student loan consolidation blog

2:29 AM  
Blogger forclosed said...

Hello, Your blog is awesome but I was looking for house cleaning business so I guess im on my way searching some more. Thanks for the great info.

6:00 PM  
Blogger paint2828 said...

Great information on here. I can only wish to write so well. Anyways I was out surfing for starting a cleaning business and found you so I thought I would say hello and thanks for the info. Gotta run Bye

2:18 PM  
Blogger daniel said...

Sad to say I just got back from a dart tournament and decided to log in and do some surfing. I love your blog. It had some very good laughs. I am doing a paper on unix disaster recovery and have been downloading information for the last two hours. I don�t know how I came across your blog but I am sure glad I did. It has set me back a little because I have spent the last 2 hours reading your archives. If you don�t mind I would like to add you to my favorites so I can back again and read some more. Well I need to get back to unix disaster recovery. I am almost finished with it. Great job.

p.s some great points on your site

11:00 AM  
Blogger paint2828 said...

Hi After searching page after page about how to start a house cleaning business I ran across your blog which caught my attention because, of the amount of valuable and informative information you have. Unfortunately this is not exactly what I was looking for, however I enjoyed reading all your information. Thanks for the reading.

12:20 PM  
Blogger grape-koolaide said...

Fascinating blog. I loved the site you did a good
job on it, I will be back! I surf the net for blog
like this one.
I want you to stop and compare with my cash advance seattle blog.

11:02 PM  
Blogger Joe Berenguer said...

Hi Blogger!I like your blog! Keep up the
good work, you are providing a great resource on the Internet here!
If you have a moment, please take a look at my site:
loans center
It pretty much covers loans center related issues.
Best regards!

2:39 AM  
Blogger James Baker said...

I just came across your blog and wanted to
drop you, Blogger, a note telling you how impressed I was with
the information you have posted here.
If you have a moment, please visit my site:
loans center
It covers loans center related contents.
I send you warm regards and wish you continued success.

7:22 AM  
Blogger Joe Berenguer said...

I just came across your blog and wanted to
drop you, Blogger, a note telling you how impressed I was with
the information you have posted here.
If you have a moment, please visit my site:
loans center
It covers loans center related contents.
I send you warm regards and wish you continued success.

4:04 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

Web Counters