Saturday, September 17, 2005

Pictures Prove There's Life at Tulane

These have been posted on my site a few times, and I think everyone needs to see them. These pictures punctuate exactly what Scott Cowen has been staying, Tulane sustained very little damage at all. I think the real concern is the surrounding housing. The person who took these pictures shows there is significant mold in his house. However, if we can get in and assess damage, or have landlords do it, most places can be cleaned up in a reasonable amount of time. In the uptown area, the mold and water levels were relatively modest, so I think the effort will be substantially smaller than other parts of the gulf coast. I think we are moving from the hoping phase to the action phase. Therefore, I do plan to launch my non-profit fund next week, and get the word out on my reconstruction effort. Try to stay tuned, because I need your help to make these ideas come to life.

Pictures of Tulane

Brett

217 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Once again, Great Job Brett and to the photographer!! A picture is worth a thousand words and these pictures provide comfort and hope!

4:36 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
TULANE PHOTOS 13-20
from nola.com
Times-Picayune photos
"Inventory of the damage"

http://www.nola.com/katrinaphotos/tp/gallery.ssf?cgi-bin/view_gallery.cgi/nola/view_gallery.ata?g_id=3944

5:26 AM  
Anonymous my favorite martian said...

There is also "proof" of life on Mars.

I'm not moving back there anytime soon either.

6:45 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i don't think it looks that bad. a lot of trees down, some broken windows, and some water damage. 4 months is a long time for them to rebuild.

7:14 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Now that I see the windows blown out in Sharp I am more anxious than ever to get in there and retrieve what is left of my daughter's belongings. A heavy rain could wipe out whatever is left. The main doors in the photos appear propped open, but don't know if it's worth and eight hour ride down there to not be able to get into the building although we have a key to her room.

7:28 AM  
Anonymous ncgwmom said...

But don't those same pictures show you why they cannot have us all scrambling in there to get stuff while they're trying to get the place put back together? I understand your problem. We have a computer, almost $500 in textbooks, a bass guitar, and most of our son's things in that dorm at Tulane--and we are eleven hours from NOLA. He is making do with very little where he is because we cannot afford to replace it all--or even most of it--and he understands that and is content. But it is just stuff. He is safe, and if we let the people who are restoring the campus do their jobs without us getting in the way, it is MORE likely that these things will survive.

Last night, on the chat, PC said that air conditioners were being used as part of the process, run by generators all over campus. It seems to me that the more likely way to get our kids' things back will be to have patience and let the pros do their jobs. And if something is lost, well, then, it's lost. My son isn't. That's the bottom line for me.

8:15 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

President Cowen also said that they are compiling an inventory of what is damaged in every room. Let them do their work and you will be able to go to campus in a few weeks when they are done with the cleanup

8:25 AM  
Anonymous TulaneMom said...

I know everyone is eager to get back to New Orleans, but I think everyone should read this before making any decisions about rushing back. This is text from a Newsweek interview with a top Environmental Policy Analyst regarding the risks to people going back before accurate environmental assessments are done.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9370519/site/newsweek/page/2/

A Toxic Gumbo
An environmental expert warns residents about the hazards of returning to New Orleans—now home to a dangerous brew of toxic chemicals and bacteria.

By Bao Ong
Newsweek
Updated: 7:05 p.m. ET Sept. 16, 2005

Sept. 16, 2005 - Contaminated floodwaters and air pollution have devastated the Gulf Coast ecosystem. As Hurricane Katrina victims try to rebuild their lives after one of the worst natural disasters in American history, the environmental impact remains a looming threat.

It’s still unclear how long it will take for the environment to recover, as officials weigh the possible risks to returning residents. Hugh Kaufman, a senior policy analyst for the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response with 35 years of experience at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Washington, addressed his concerns with NEWSWEEK’s Bao Ong. Excerpts:

Online Newshour
Hugh Kaufman
NEWSWEEK: What do you think about the mayor of New Orleans saying he’ll reopen the city in the coming days?
Hugh Kaufman: The mayor said New Orleans will “breathe again.” Yeah, they’ll breathe bacteria, viruses and volatizing toxic chemicals. There is no environmental assessment. I mean, you can’t even make a determination of the risk factor. But more important, we don’t know what to tell the public in terms of what their risk is when they come back. The public thinks it’s safe. It’s one of the more reckless and irresponsible government decisions made in the last decade. Second only to [former EPA chief] Christie Todd Whitman after [the] World Trade towers came down [saying], “We’ve tested the air and it’s safe. So ya’ll come back.” And now [some] of the people that came back are sick as dogs.

What do you think the government is basing its decisions on?
There is no environmental characterization that has been accomplished. There’s been a lot of political spin but no valid environmental assessment to determine the amount of hazardous material, bacteria and viruses that are in the air, in the muck and in the dust that the people would be exposed to 24/7 when they go back.

So have you been down there?
No. I’ve done thousands of cases like this. They’re all the same. The only difference between this and other cases is the size of it.

How does the environmental damage of Katrina compare to other hurricanes?
The hurricane did allow for the breakage of the sewer systems which put into the environment everything that was in the sewer, which was human waste and industrial waste. It also caused breakage of containers that store hazardous materials. It’s [a] toxic gumbo.

What are the possible long-term effects on the environment?
Oh, boy. First of all, you’re going to wipe out shellfishing, shrimp fishing and parts of the water down there because of the discharge into Lake Pontchartrain, the Mississippi [River] and moving down to the gulf. You’re going to have a tremendous amount of toxic waste that has to be cleaned up and disposed of. You’re going to have air pollution that will make some people sick initially and increase the risk of cancer 10, 20, 30 years down the line in the areas that have been contaminated with the oil and chemical waste. It’s uncountable, the amount of environmental and public-health problems that most folks down there are going to see for years to come. If Love Canal is a fly, then this is an elephant—in terms of environment and public-health effects.

Can you talk more specifically about these toxins and they risks they pose?
You’ve got oil and petroleum products, which have toxic constituents that have been documented to cause cancer. You have other chemicals coming from landfills and Superfund sites that haven’t been documented. You’ve documented chromium, arsenic and lead, which with some of the other toxic chemicals can cause birth defects, spontaneous abortions, illness—short term and long term—and asthma. Until a thorough assessment is completed of the three pathways—air, direct contact and ingestion of hazardous materials—until that assessment has been done, nobody can quantify how many more cancers, how many more deaths will occur down the line as a result of precipitous interaction with these hazardous and toxic materials that are ever present in that region of the country.

What kind of assessment and how long will it take?
There are some areas that you can do some quick assessments where there has not been major water damage and [which] have not been impacted by waterborne waste and toxic material, like the French Quarter. You could make decisions in a couple of weeks. I’m not against allowing the public back. They just need to be given the information on what type of risks they’re taking [for] when they go back. Right now there’s a lot of spin that’s coming out of politicians that things are safe. That’s irresponsible and reckless public policy because of the pollution in that area.

What kind of timeline would you give a resident in a flooded area for coming back?
It depends where they are. Areas that have been submerged and exposed to high volumes of toxic materials, it would be years before they could go back. Other areas with much less contamination, it would be months where they could go back safely. My view is as long as you characterize the area so they know what they’re being exposed to, I have no problem with them going back at any time. It’s their choice. As long as they’re told what risks they’re taking and are told what protective measures they should take. They have to be told environmental facts and the truth.

Have you heard from flood victims?
I’m getting some e-mails from folks who have been evacuated wanting to talk about the assessment, and I try to answer them and give them information. But I think most of the people down there are getting their information from the news media, and of course you’re getting conflicting information because everybody is spinning. You’ve got government agencies speaking from both sides of their mouth. You’ve got trouble.

What kind of rebuilding programs will these Gulf Coast cities need to recover?
They’ll need tens of billions of dollars of federal money to clean up and rebuild and to take care of the folks who have been harmed by this. It’ll be like the Marshall Plan was in Berlin. Or like we said we were going to do for Iraq.

You dealt with the environmental impact in New York after 9/11. How does Hurricane Katrina compare?
It’s very different. You’ve got a very large number of people spread out over a broad area who can’t get out. In 9/11, people could get out and they did. But [the government is] making the same mistakes as they did after 9/11. There’s no difference. You’ve got the rescue work being done by the military, by the Coast Guard and local heroes. That’s been very good, [as expected]. But the work to protect the public health and the environment—not just that the people who [survived] and the heroes—that was just as much a disaster as it was after 9/11.

© 2005 Newsweek, Inc.

8:27 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Scott Cowen isn't going to allow us to come back if it is not safe. That article even said that the areas that were not flooded too bad won't have the same amount of pollution in the air. Thats why people should have no problem with waiting 6 or 7 weeks to come back and get their stuff out of their dorms.

9:46 AM  
Anonymous Emily said...

Thursday evening I sent a letter to papers in Dallas, Houston, Jackson Miss., Birmingham, Tuscaloosa, Baton Rouge, Lafayette, New York, DC, Charlottesville, Syracuse, Richmond, and Atlanta; adding that "I wrote the following, which can be used as a letter to the editor, reader opinion column, or simply for information's sake, not to have it published in a newspaper but rather to make sure that people with a public voice might be able to let others know about the situation, if they are so inclined."

Here's the letter:

"Hurricane Katrina scattered Tulane University students across the United States, but the general sentiment is that students want to return as soon as possible. Tulane students have, for the most part, an intense loyalty to the school that the prospect of a semester away has served only to intensify, not diminish.

I ended up at Georgia State University in Atlanta, GA. Georgia State opened its doors wide to all students from the effected area, whether or not they were a Georgia resident. And GSU charged only $100.00 to each student, total. They asked that those of us with financial aid fill out the necessary paperwork so that GSU would receive the funds. To me this seemed more than fair. I cannot think of an adequate way to express my graditude to the school that has received every single displaced student that walked through their doors with patience and compassion. The actions of this university, and others like it, are actions of great charity.

The higher education system has been increasingly strained for resources over the last decade, and displaced students have placed enormous additional financial and institutional stress on the universities that have welcomed us. So I was more than willing to offer my financial aid to Georgia State. Considering that one of my scholarships comes from the Georgia State Board of Education, it seemed only fitting that a state university receive that scholarship during my time away from Tulane.

But I cannot give it to them. Nor can I offer them my Federal Stafford Loan. Why? Because Tulane is keeping all tuition payments for the fall, and requires all payments not yet made to be completed by December 1, 2005. My fall tuition is paid, with my financial aid credited to my account. I cannot take the scholarship funds out of my Tulane tuition account without having to pay additional money to Tulane, a school that is not open for classes this fall.

When I transferred into Tulane, the university did not ask me to pay for the transfer credits I received. I had already paid for those credits when I took the courses at my original school. That school was able to use my tuition to cover its expenses during the period I attended. Now that I am at Tulane, Tulane should rightfully receive the resources from my tuition payments during the period that I attend the school. Right now I am not attending Tulane. No one is. We continue to maintain, and cherish even, our affiliation with the university. But we are not taking classes there. We are taking classes at universities across the country who have been so remarkably generous and compassionate the least we could do as students in ensure that they receive some fraction of their expenses.

I love Tulane—the students, the academic opportunities, the faculty and the general Tulane environment. However, I consider the university's response to the tuition issue disgraceful to Tulane's reputation and stature.

A catastrophe like Hurricane Katrina cries out for sacrifices. Across the nation, people have given their time, services, money and belongings in unprecedented numbers. I understand that Tulane needs the resources created by tuition payments not only to recover from its own damages, but also, as the largest private employer in New Orleans to encourage stability as the city begins to rebuild. But I feel taking the full amount of fall tuition from students in dishonorable. That money is desperately needed elsewhere.

I'm aware that running a university is an enormously complicated enterprise, and I'm certain that there are details or factors I've overlooked in my understanding of the situation. But Tulane is doing a disservice to their fellow institutions of higher education, and it is a dishonorable act that deserves addressing."

I was contacted the next day by a reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

And today (Saturday) the article entitled "Displaced students' tuition a mixed bag" is on the front page of the AJC Metro section, written by Andrea Jones.

Thought y'all might like to know.

Emily (erm2003@gmail.com)

9:54 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

WHO is doing an inventory or every room of things that are damaged? I feel that is MY job. I think that is opening up another can of worms for the university - being in private rooms going through our things- those are our private rooms - who is giving permission for people to go through OUR rooms. I doubt apartment complexes are letting "someone on the outside" go through each apt. of the lessors to see or take an inventory! This is crazy policy. What are our RIGHTS - I feel we have none! I don't want anyone I don't know going through my child's things! Period!

10:13 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Where is our privacy? What is the privacy act of the university? I want to see a policy on outside people going through these rooms! I can't believe this!

10:15 AM  
Anonymous TUDADINTX said...

THAT'S RIGHT! THE UNIVERSITY HAS NO RIGHT GOING THROUGH THESE ROOMS TO ACCESS THE DAMAGE OF THE THINGS IN THE DORMS. UNLESS, OF COURSE, THE UNIVERSITY IS GOING TO REIMBURSE US FOR OUR DAMAGES! YOU CAN DO A UNIVERSITY ASSESSMENT OF DAMAGES OF YOUR BUILDING AFTER WE GET OUR THINGS OUT OF THERE!

10:17 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The policy to admit students free of charge was agreed to by all of the leading educational associations. It was meant as an act of charity, to support Gulf Coast schools during this difficult time. I can understand if you are upset about not getting YOUR Tulane payments refunded, but your letter seems to miss the intention of other institutions to "donate" services during this difficult time.

10:26 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The university does have the right, as do apartment owenrs, to access buildings that they own to document their damages. They need to be able to do this to collect insurance payments. I do not think they are counting up your sweaters, but they probably are noting what the general contents of the rooms are (i.e. clothing, electronics, etc)and the likely damage due to water, mold, glass, and wind.

10:35 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yeah, they can do whatever they want with the dorms because it is their property. You do not own the dorm you are in, you are in effect renting it from the university. That is why you have to abide by their rules and why you can get in trouble for stuff like smoking and drinking in your room.

10:40 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

emily, I thought your letter illustrates just one of the various scenarios that we are all experiencing and would like to view the article, but could not find it on line.

anonymous (who is screaming about TU getting access to the dorms w/o your permission!), landlords are allowed in properties in order to protect property. If anything is missing you can hold them accountable. Hopefully, they are securing broken windows and checking for leaks and water damage from units above. I would expect no less. Our son lives off campus. I wish there was someone who could check his things.

I have commented on these blogs a few times, trying to express how grateful we are that our son is safe and that although we have issues, it is nothing compared to the suffering others have experienced and it should help put all of this is better perspective. This morning, that sentiment was reinforced twice again and I wanted to share it with all of you.

There was a quote in our local paper this morning from an emergency worker from our town who had just returned from the Gulf. He was one of the emergency responders from our town who has seen other disasters first-hand and this is what he said. "Hurricane Andrew was an afternoon thunderstorm compared to what Katrina did...I never knew anything on Earth could cause so much damage". The article goes on to say "it was a telling statement coming from a man who saw firsthand the aftermath of Andrew in South Florida in 1992 -- and Hurricane Hugo in South Carolina in 1989. He also experienced the 1998 wildfires and the three storms that battered his own community last year." I also received a forwarded email from a client today. It was written by her daughter who is also an emergency responder and she was speaking specifically about New Orleans. She said, "Let me first start out by saying that I'm proud to be here and happy to be doing something that makes a difference in someone's life other than my own. The devastation is worse than anything I've ever seen but people have managed to remain positive and hopefull that their lives will someday be back to what they were before Katrina. Many of the folks I'm working 15 hour days with have lost everything, they no longer have homes, their families have been sent off to safer locations and they still remain...it's humbling and reinforces my faith in the goodness of people. Today I flew over the city in a helicopter and saw for the first time what the Corps, the rest of thed federal government, local government, international support and the people of New Orleans will have to face for the next 2-5 years...I can't even begin to wrap my mind around how to determine where to begin the rebuilding efforts and and the amount of time it will take to complete....2-5 years is the estimate but I imagine New Orleans will never be the same again. With that said, feel fortunate you didn't live here and you still have homes and family....many of these people don't. Everytime I begin to complain about my life I'm going to close my eyes and remember what I saw today, nothing in my world could ever be as bad as what the residents of New Orleans have gone through and will continue to go through for a very long time."

I know we have issues, but we really need to step back and take a deep breath. Our problems are nothing in comparison. Our children are safe!

10:45 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I know they own the building. I know they have a right to be in the dorms accessing their damage. But they don't have a right to be assessing MY damage. And by the way, we don't have sweaters in our rooms. It's summer in NO, almost year round! :)

10:51 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The Atlanta AJC article this morning stated the Federal Government is giving $1K to every university offering a displaced student a spot. The state schools in Georgia offered displaced students spots well in advance of Scott Cowan's tuition scam. Their generosity was not as a result of his plea - they stepped up to the plate first and he figured he could benefit from it. I do not want anybody going through my student's things, what a ridiculous waste of time. Let us down there to get their belongings. If the administration drags their feet, when we finally get to return I suspect it will be to pack them up never to return to Tulane.

11:04 AM  
Anonymous Ellooney said...

I feel that is one of the main reasons the university is NOT letting the student's retrieve their things. They are worried when you get there, you won't be back! However, it is not the condition of the university that will keep us away next year,but the total lack of fair policy to date: tuition policy, book refund (lack of a "of course you'll get credit for books we didn't use - like they are doing at UNO" and the fact that they are not letting our children access their things.
I feel like this university is not in control of this situation at all. There has been not one benevolent gesture from this school's administration. They are acting as takers, not givers, but expecting everyone else to give: money, time, patience, tuition, etc.

11:19 AM  
Anonymous tufreshman said...

I really thing that Tulane is taking huge risks with their freshman class, who have no real "loyalty" to TU or to NO, yet. Of course they "love" the school, or wouldn't have chosen it, but wait and see - most will "love" their new schools and find a way to adapt to their 2nd choices just fine. I have not seen one act of fairness designed to get them back by spring. This, to me, is risky, at best, and frankly, unbelieveable.

11:23 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thanks for the pictures - encouraging yet indicative of the scope of the job ahead. As the parent of a junior who can't wait to return to Tulane, I'd like to tell the freshmen parents not to write off Tulane yet. I understand your many concerns but my daughter's experience, both academically and in personal growth, has been exemplary. And to all of you griping about "fairness" in tuition issues, how fair are you being? Your tuition dollars not only pay for the professors and classrooms but also the administrative side of a college education. Suffice it to say that element is more than earning our money as they try to get Tulane up and running. This is an extraordinarily complicated situation but our response should be simple, support Tulane or withdraw and shut-up.

12:06 PM  
Anonymous tufreshman said...

Again, hard to support something that doesn't seem to be returning the favor - even to YOUR junior daughter!

12:31 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Junior Mom,

I understand your frustation with the inability for all of us to see it as you do, but not all of us agree with the policies of a place where we were for only 6 hours. Sorry, and if we all withdraw and shut up, then your daughter will not have a college to return to. Do the math.

12:35 PM  
Anonymous mars attacks said...

Nice city! We'll take it!

Take us to your leader!

First Nagin, then this Blanco, something called a bush or shrub, the color brown, a Chertoff, and some clown named Cowen. We thought there was intelligent life, but all the human life forms seem wasted. Stop trying to foll us, like some naive Tulane freshman.

Where is that Nicholson dude?

12:36 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey guys, I'm the one that took the photos, just wanted to make a few notes about what it was like out there. Surreal is the best way to put it. All in all, there was little major structural damage aside from the flooding on campus. Unfortunately, I was unable to get to the academic quad since it was swarming with national guard and I was "encouraged" to leave. So I went everywhere I could. There was also a whole lot of contracters out there running the pumps. I'm pretty optimistic about their ability to repair things in time for spring. And yes, Touchdown Jesus still stands at Loyola. As far as residential areas, most of them seemed ok. The national guard guys we talked to said they saw very little flood damage in the homes that they checked out when they looked for bodies. I talked to some Entergy guys and they said that most of the substations are hot, its just a matter of getting the lines back up. With all the trucks I saw there, I bet they could get most of it done in a couple weeks, but I wouldn't count on the street car lines coming up anytime soon, they were wrecked. I'm going back for more photos next Friday, if there's any place you guys would like to see in particular, email the address to me at dmurph83@gmail.com, I'll try my best.
Here's how I got in by the way:

Left Baton Rouge thursday at 4:30am, took I-10 to williams, beat the roadblocks. Took williams down to jefferson, then jeff to oak and then river road. Got to my house on Broadway around 6am without encountering roadblocks. There were some checkpoints when i was driving around uptown, specifically around claiborne, but national guard was generally nice.

-David Murphy

12:41 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anyone hear this? Cowen was on his way to the football game yesterday and his dog, Gibson was answering the questions on the the chat line. Makes sense.

2:04 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

12:06 - I paid money for Tulane tuition - at Tulane, not money for them to get the school "up and running".

2:07 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Scott Cowen is going to have students back on that Campus this Spring no matter what. He's already said that Tulane couldn't go on if they weren't back (a bunch of BS if I've ever heard it). He's a businessman, as such he's more worried about business than safety. I'm not letting my kid be a guines pig in Cowen's science experiment. Maybe next fall, not until.

2:42 PM  
Blogger Brett Hyman said...

That is ridiculous. A) you are treating your son or daughter like he or she can't make decisions for themself, why dont you trust them a little bit
B) Scott Cowen a businessman? He's been a lifetime teacher and administrator. Other that his job security, he has NO financial interest in reopening the school. He can get another job very easily, he wont get paid anymore or any less if the school opens.
C) Do you actually believe he doesn't care about the student's health? He can't have a university for very long if they are all sick.

Your argument is irrational and illogical.

2:55 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"I don't see how any university can be essentially out of business for one year and hope to recover from it in any shape or form of what they looked like before," says Mr. Cowen. "We will be back in the spring. We've got to be ready. If not, we might as well close all the doors and walk away. I mean, how long can New Orleans be closed?"

"As Mr. Greer, the trustee, left to return to his Connecticut home last week, he was comforted by the thought that Mr. Cowen has the experience to deal with Tulane's ordeal. "At the heart, this is a business problem and Scott is a business person," says Mr. Greer. "We're going to come back from this stronger than ever."

Source

Care to try again Brett?

3:13 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

From a graduate of 40+ years ago:

I am pleased to see how well "My University and Alma Mater" weathered what is largest single natural catastrophe in our nation's history. Having some background in emergency diaster work, I find the efforts of Mr. Cowen commendable in view of the limited communications and resources available.

For those of you who are truly "Tulane Students" and plan to continue and finish your education there, I applaud your resolve - besides, what other institution of higher education in the U.S. comes with "the French Quarter".

For those of you who decry the policies of Tulane, necessitated as a result of this disaster, and who feel that you are somehow being deprived of something to which you feel you are entitled, threatening to go elsewhere for your education - PLEASE DO! I, for one, do not want you as a member of the alumni of Tulane University.

3:20 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

We don't care what the heck you think, geezer. It's OUR Tulane now, and Scott Cowen has dipped into my pockets for the last time. There hasn't been much in the way of communication other than, "give us your money, see you in the spring". The "chats" have been a total joke, but at least I know wher to get football tickets if I want them. If you think he's doing a great job I think the alzheimer's is setting in. I'm at UVA now and this is where I'm going to stay. New Orleans always was a pig sty, damned if I'll go back there now.

3:44 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here are some proven facts about mold and flood/hurricane victims-



FACT-



Among any surfaces, water infiltration can induce mold to proliferate within 24 to 48 hours.


Although most fungi is harmless, many modern household molds cause mycotoxins, which have been proven to cause permanent neurological, psychological, pathological, and immunological damage.


Many indoor molds are known causative carcinogens, and combined with ideal breeding conditions, can lead to cancer and several types of autoimmune disease in record time.


Exposure to toxigenic molds can cause death in extreme cases, even among the healthiest individuals, despite false claims that say only certain individuals with impaired immune systems are at risk.


The United States government has failed to designate any programs to assist the public with this epidemic and they ignore every plea for help due to the real problem at hand; high costs and an easy cover-up as many feign ignorance. Additionally, they have hired outside unscrupulous consultants to provide cock-eyed evidence to dissuade the public from the true evidence in hopes that the ignorance of people United States will ignore the truth. However, according to Dr. Aristo Vojdani, over 40 million have been affected already, and now fungal exposure is a national health crisis with epidemic proportions.


Any ground that has been supporting a structure containing these molds is also toxic, and digging down at least two meters to rebuild can alleviate many of these potential problems.


Common symptoms associated with mycotoxin-causing fungal exposure are similar to other forms of poisoning, which include: acid reflux, brain fog, asthma-type symptoms, rashes, easy-bruising, dizziness, short-term memory, and balance problems (more symptoms listed here).


Trying to salvage precious mementos, antiques, artwork and family heirlooms can be one of the worst things that these struggling victims do. Although it can quite cathartic for many flood or hurricane victims to try and save old memories or significant pieces, the chance of fungal growth is more than 99%. Without proper containment, ozone, proven antimicrobials and UV light, it is almost impossible to “clean” items effectively and with the addition of someone who has been compromised with fungal exposure, the chances of cross-contamination are very high. There has even been a record number of otherwise healthy plaintiff attorneys lately who have died from fungal exposure just through papers brought into.


Most hurricane victims are very understandably angered by the fact that an organization who would actually do real “good faith efforts” towards these citizens would finish their rescue efforts and burn the disease ridden areas or assist in proactive relief efforts, rather than leave the unspeakable problem of remediating or abandoning and paying for homes that are unhealthy to occupy. But once again, the burden of the problem is left in the hands of innocent consumers so big corporations such as the mortgage industry can have it both ways, profit, profit, profit. Meanwhile, many sick families are burdened with the ordeal of living with sick, moldy houses, and deciding between living homeless and healthy or dying in their “dream homes.”


This attitude of hurricane victims of crying such phrases such as, How can this [injustice] happen in America? According to the hundreds of thousands of mold victims who lose their homes on a daily basis throughout the United States, frantically ask this question as they lose their homes and health to mold everyday, but no one listens to them either. This is America, a country with leadership who appears to care nothing about the average person. There is no more freedom here than any third world country, as this is what will be happening here soon, no rights for citizens as major corporations take our rights away every day. You will see some major examples, and repercussions of this within 18 months, to be perfectly accurate, according to some new legislation that will be altering thousands of people and their inalienable rights firsthand. It is no coincidence that Halliburton will be controlling the rebuilding of these new cities, who will now become oil refinery sites due to mass foreclosures and loss of properties.

3:45 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Mold has certainly made it's way into people's homes as well as the headlines recently. Many people still don't fully understand the health hazards of fungal exposure. The term toxic mold is somewhat misleading as it connotates an idea that certain molds are toxic, when actually certain types of molds produce secondary metabolites that produce toxins. The correct term is mycotoxins. Airborne mycotoxins from can definitely destroy one's health. Sometimes, people are unaware that they are breathing mold spores and mycotoxins until they are very sick. Certain people have a minor allergic reactions to the non-toxic mold, but once you leave the affected area they most likely recover with few serious side effects. However, if they have been exposed to the dangerous molds such as Stachybotrys or Chaetomium, they could suffer from a myriad of serious symptoms and illnesses such as chronic bronchitis, learning disabilities, mental deficiencies, heart problems, cancer, multiple sclerosis, chronic fatigue, lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple chemical sensitivity, bleeding lungs and much more.
http://mold-help.org/content/view/478/

3:46 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I've been reading these blogs from the very beginning and I have to say, at first it was wonderful how supportive everyone was of each other. When there was no other available information, this spot provided some much needed peace of mind. However, reading the blogs from the last couple of days have made me absolutely SICK. It is DISGUSTING how students and PARENTS alike are ripping into each other's throats with such viciousness and attacking each other with the maturity of a 4 year old. Come one, we are all in the same boat as we have all lost something and are anxious to get it back. This has been a horrible experience for us, filled with anxiety, stress, depression, and loss, but there are people who have lost EVERYTHING. How can we expect to recover AT ALL if we are fighting and tearing each other down? Get a clue and some some class, learn some respect and how to communicate as mature human beings, and realize that if we work TOGETHER in a calm and collected manner, we can make things happen much quicker.

-A Disappointed Tulane Junior

4:15 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

And by the way, Brett, you are doing a fabulous job

4:16 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm glad to know so many grown ups get so much exercise from jumping to conclusions...about Mr. Cowen, Tulane administrators and their actions and the causes for the actions, the actions of students, their belongings and yes, even mold...find a mold remediator and get some facts..chicken littles!

4:22 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I found this on the NOLA site. It seems the campus was flooded.
Saturday, September 17, 2005

**********

Universities and colleges suffer damage

Saturday, 5:16 p.m.

By Coleman Warner
Staff writer

Floodwaters covered two-thirds of the Tulane University’s Uptown campus between Freret Street and South Claiborne Avenue, to depths of three or four feet in many places. The brackish water tossed debris about a baseball stadium that was under renovation, ruined virtually all of the university’s vehicle fleet and spilled into the basement of Howard-Tilton Memorial Library, where a world-famous jazz music archive is stored, officials said. The university hired a document salvage firm, but it was unclear Saturday how much of the archive will be saved. Much of the campus was strewn with large tree limbs.

“We’re going to be buying a lot of stuff,” said Senior Vice President Yvette Jones. “We’re moving quickly.”

**************

It seems President Cowen may be understating the damage. Mold and mildew are extremely serious. Students should not go back until assessment of damages is done by at least 2 independent environmental firms confirm that Tulane is 100% free from health concerns for ALL students. President Cowen stated Tulane is fortunate to have their own professors who are specialists, but I think we need independent sources.

4:24 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Saturday, September 17, 2005

Universities and colleges suffer damage

Saturday, 5:16 p.m.

By Coleman Warner
Staff writer

4:25 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here is the link to an article on NOLA's website.

http://www.nola.com/newslogs/breakingtp/index.ssf?/mtlogs/nola_Times-Picayune/archives/2005_09_17.html#080701

4:27 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Amazing


NEW ORLEANS (Sept. 17) - Day after day, for more than two weeks, the 76-year-old man sat trapped and alone in his attic, sipping from a dwindling supply of water until it ran out. No food. No way out of a house ringed by foul floodwaters.

Without ever leaving home, Gerald Martin lived out one of the most remarkable survival stories of Hurricane Katrina. Rescuers who found him Friday, as they searched his neighborhood by boat, were astounded at his good spirits and resiliency after 18 days without food or human contact.

"It's an incredible story of survival," said Louie Fernandez, spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency search unit that carried out the rescue.

In recent days, search crews have been finding corpses by the dozens in the still-flooded neighborhoods of New Orleans, but not trapped survivors. The FEMA search-and-rescue boat navigating through the Eighth Ward didn't expect to find anyone alive at 6010 Painters St., but they planned to search the premises of a one-story wood house.

As the motor idled and the boat glided forward, they heard a voice.

"Hey, over here."

Using a sledgehammer, a FEMA rescuer broke down the front door and went inside with another team member, struggling through a living room jumbled with overturned, sodden furniture.

They found Martin sitting in a chair in the sludge-covered kitchen, partially undressed in an effort to keep cool. After 16 days in his attic, he had descended to the ground floor two days earlier when the floodwaters - once up to the ceiling - finally drained, even though the house remained surrounded by several feet of water.

Incredibly, Martin - who ran out of his gallon-and-a-half water supply on Thursday - was able to walk out of the house with just a bit of assistance.

"He was weak, very tired, but he was able to speak, able to stand," Fernandez said. "He was very relieved. He was very thirsty. He was in good spirits."

Martin was given water to drink, then taken to Ochsner Foundation Hospital, where nurse Jinny Resor said he was treated for dehydration. She said Martin had taken medication while he was trapped, but she wasn't sure what it was for.

In a brief telephone interview with The Associated Press late Friday night, Martin said he was felling fine.



"So far, so good," he said.

As for his ordeal, his description was concise: "I was living in the attic for 16 days, and I was living off water."

The two rescuers who retrieved him are firefighters with a California-based FEMA team - J.D. Madden of Santa Clara and Eric Mijangos of Menlo Park.

"I don't know how much longer he could have went on without water," said Madden, 29.

Martin's family left before the storm, but he stayed to attend church, later took a nap and woke up to find that his home was filling with water, Madden said.

Martin only had time to grab some water and get to his attic, which he described as feeling like an oven during day-after-day of mid-90-degree heat that followed the storm. Madden said the heat in the attic might have been even worse, perhaps fatal, except for shade provided by a fallen tree.

Staff Sgt. Jason Randor, a military police officer with the Massachusetts National Guard, watched the rescue from another boat that was helping provide security for the search team.

He recalled jubilant yells from the firefighters when they realized someone alive was inside.

Martin emerged, wearing jeans and a shirt.

"While they were putting him in the chopper, he asked if they could stop on the way at Taco Bell to get something to eat," Randor said.




Fernandez, of FEMA, was on scene when Martin arrived at a FEMA base camp before going to the hospital.

"He had lost a lot weight," Fernandez said. "He definitely had to hold his pants up with his hands."

Martin was the first trapped person found alive by Madden's California Task Force Three team in its 12 days of calling out to homes from the boat and peering into windows.

"We've been in the rescue mode the whole time and haven't given up hope that there was someone out there alive," he said.

But officials overseeing the search effort said the discovery of corpses and the dwindling number of rescues has been taking an emotional toll on search units.

"Our squad members are getting access to trauma and grief counselors," said FEMA rescue squad liaison Charles Hood. "It's becoming a very difficult task."

Fernandez said Saturday that Martin's rescue was a welcome morale boost for his colleagues.

"Little victories like we saw yesterday help motivate people, who are facing one of the toughest jobs they've ever faced," he said.

4:42 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Brett Hyman said...
That is ridiculous. A) you are treating your son or daughter like he or she can't make decisions for themself, why dont you trust them a little bit
B) Scott Cowen a businessman? He's been a lifetime teacher and administrator. Other that his job security, he has NO financial interest in reopening the school. He can get another job very easily, he wont get paid anymore or any less if the school opens.
C) Do you actually believe he doesn't care about the student's health? He can't have a university for very long if they are all sick.

Your argument is irrational and illogical.

It is nice to see that you have a lot of admiration and respect for President Cowen. I hope that your assessment of him is 100 percent correct. You have to understand however that many of us can only judge him on what we see in the news, the chats etc. Statements like the following one make us pause to think:

"I don't see how any university can be essentially out of business for one year and hope to recover from it in any shape or form of what they looked like before," says Mr. Cowen. "We will be back in the spring. We've got to be ready. If not, we might as well close all the doors and walk away. I mean, how long can New Orleans be closed?"

When he was asked if he was making contingency plans in that chat the other day he said that he wasn't. I forget his exact statement but he said that he was confident that the school would reopen. When someone questioned him further about it, he did admit that his position might be irrational or irresponsible (not sure what the wording was exactly).

I don't think that anyone in that city is focused on the health issues at the moment. They are dealing with their basic
Physiological needs – (need for food, water, and sustenance).

As far as us not trusting you to make your own judgments, I think I speak for every parent here when I say that we are very proud of the young adults you have become. You are bright, talented, ambitious and caring. But whether you like it or not we are still parents and you are the most important thing to us in the whole world. Young people also have a sense of immortality that isn't always justified. Someday when you have children, you will understand why we are so stupid.

There have been a lot of angry people calling the school. The President Cowen we saw in the chat the other day seemed to be a little softer than the one we had been seeing. I sense that the strong-armed approach may be softening. I'm going to sit back and see what happens next.

5:36 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

How can you read that heart-wrenching story previously posted about that brave, 76 yr old man and still complain about posessions in a dorm room?!? And then continue to complain about Dr. Cowen "robbing" us of our tuition? How disgusting.

And...the posting from the person who is currently attending UVA??? I live near UVA and am very familiar with the school & the people that attend there and I can tell you that you definitely sound like the "type" to fit right in Charlottsville. They gave the meaning to the "ME" generation. Welcome to that world! If you think New Orleans was such a pig sty, then you should NOT return, you should have transferred out long before the storm. Shame on you.

Shame on all of you who are only thinking of your own needs at a time like this. We've all lost something as a result of the hurricane. Let's try to keep things in perspective. Let's attempt to keep our dignity and self respect. Try to be patient and give Dr. Cowen, the staff & faculty of Tulane a chance to do what is right. I, too am a very concerned parent but, I know when to count my blessings and have faith that things can only get better if you give it time. Complaints & threats do not make progress. They only impeed that which is needed to be done. As others have stated before, calm down and let's give it some time.

5:46 PM  
Anonymous ncgwmom said...

Amen to the poster of 5:46! I am ashamed of some what has been posted here. Have some faith, patience and a little sense of proportion, people. If that's not possible for you, then make your plans to go elsewhere. NOLA is going to need stronger people.

6:31 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Scott Cowen never admitted his plan was irrational or irresponsible, he said that it was indeed a bold plan, but he has a lot of confidence that the school will open.

6:41 PM  
Anonymous Tulane08 said...

Hey parents!
i'm sure tulane will have no problem writing you a receipt for your tuition that turned into a donation. you can write it off as a donation to the hurracne rebuilding efforts. so chill out and just be glad your child is home and not getting picked up as a dead body by the national guard.

6:54 PM  
Anonymous better living through chemistry said...

"However, if they have been exposed to the dangerous molds such as Stachybotrys or Chaetomium, they could suffer from a myriad of serious symptoms and illnesses such as... learning disabilities, mental deficiencies, heart problems, ..."

Anything like the cocaine effect on a Tulane student's brain?

7:18 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ahh, it's Saturday night, lets have a few and post on the board. I have to say that you don't sound like bright, talented, ambitious and caring young adults - you sound arrogant and unintelligent.

It is however refreshing to see that some of you have finally found a little school spirit.

7:20 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

the greenwave are mounting a comeback against mississippi state.

7:40 PM  
Blogger A Tulane Student said...

Some of you need to step back and put things into perspective. Yes, you may have lost books and computers and clothes; there are few who didn't. Many of your classmates lost their homes, their cars, everything they had. Some had friends in the city who drowned in their attics or knew people who were injured or murdered for food or fresh water. Believe me, I'm not looking forward to sorting through my mildewed belongings, but even then I'll be counting myself lucky.

Instead of fighting each other over unprecedented policies or unexpected arrangements, we should be uniting and reaching out to our friends and classmates us who are sinking into hopelessness and despondency.

8:02 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Ok i need some advice...can anyone tell me what the school plans on doing if you are going to a school with tuition less than Tulanes and have already paid fall tuition, no one is giving a straight forward answer...and i cant lose this amount of money? All ive heard is that i possible have to withdrawl to get a refund and then reapply, but what if ive already moved my stuff in my room, does that mean that i lose my housing as well! PLEASE ANY INFO!

8:10 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Can Tulane really legally hold your Stafford loans? What about PLUS loans? I talked to the school my son is in, and they have no problem switching the funds over. I assume from what I've read that Tulane may try to bill me, but I won't be able to afford to pay them and the current school for room and board. The school is a state school also, so the tuition is a fraction of Tulane's. Man, this mess is deeper and messier then all that swamp crap that fills the streets of NOLA.

8:37 PM  
Anonymous Jackie said...

Hey Brett, I just wanted to say thanks for all the work you've done on this blog. It's been my lifeline ever since the hurricane. You're doing some awesome work here. To al of the bashers, don't worry, I know better than to bash you right back. I just want to implure you to please stop your personal attacks on the school, President Cowen, and Brett himself. He is the one who has provided you with this website to voice your opinions. I honestly beg you to stop and to try and present your opinions in a calm and logical manner. I'd like to thank those of you that have been doing this. But, when I come on here and I see such vicious words, it really makes me just want to break down and cry about this whole thing. I can understand your anger, your confusion, and your fear for your children. I'm sure my parents are experiencing those same emotions. And even though I cannot speak personally for them, I'm sure your children would be heaart-broken to see the manner in which some of you express those opinions. I know I would be. So, I'm not going to yell at you. I'm not angry; I'm just really hurt. So, once again I beg you to represent yourselves in a different manner because this place is supposed to be a refuge for all of those affiliated with Tulane. I'm not asking you to stop voicing your opinions, please just try to hold back on the venom. And to the UVA student who called the Tulane Alumni a "geezer"- don't you think that was truly insulting, rude, and uncalled for. Please, try and restrain yourself. Anyway, thanks for your time. And, thank you again, Brett. Your posts brighten some of my drearier days.

8:40 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at2+shtml/025734.shtml?tswind120

Tropical Storm Phillippe

One to watch!!

8:44 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I don't think that there is any way they could hold your loans. How? Gosh. If they do, and you have to pay those back, please let us know. Trying not to spew venom. Gosh - this is a bloody mess.

9:03 PM  
Anonymous Hoos Your Daddy said...

"And...the posting from the person who is currently attending UVA??? I live near UVA and am very familiar with the school & the people that attend there and I can tell you that you definitely sound like the "type" to fit right in Charlottsville. They gave the meaning to the "ME" generation. Welcome to that world! If you think New Orleans was such a pig sty, then you should NOT return, you should have transferred out long before the storm. Shame on you."

A Pox on both of you! One is as bad as another. Why slam UVA because some reject from Tulane is welcomed there as a matter of trying to help? And, if living near UVA is such a burden, there is always the "pig sty" ready and waiting for another oinker.

Fact is, NOLA is a great city, Charlottesville a fantastic place to live, and there are pluses and minuses to both institutions, but overall, you'd be rightfully proud to graduate from either.

You almost sound like a refugee from VPISU.

9:55 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i want to go home to tulane

2:02 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just to clarify the source of the 'guidelines for temporary enrollment' ... the title of the document is "Gulf Coast Presidents Express Thanks, Urge Continued Assistance" and it clearly states in the document that "these (Gulf Coast) presidents are greatly concerned about the long term financial impact Katrina will have on their instituion. Specifically, they (i.e. one or more Gulf Coast Presidents)are urging colleague instituions enrolling their students to do the following:" and then lists the guidelines.
Tulane's FAQ sheet states "In the particular area of tuition, room, board and fees, decisions for the fall term are shaped by the guidelines designed by nine of the leading educational associations in the United States .."
This is misleading; the guidelines were designed by one or more Gulf Coast presidents.

5:32 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You lost me. Please clarify.

5:44 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have already bought textbooks for all my classes. Will I be able to use them for courses at another institution, and if not, will I get a refund?

Whether you will be able to use the textbooks depends on what your instructors at the host institution are using. If you cannot use your texts, save your receipts, and you will receive a refund when the UNO lakefront campus re-opens.


WHAT IS TULANE'S POLICY ON BOOKS THAT WERE PURCHASED FOR THE FALL SEMESTER? THIS IS UNO'S FAIR AND STUDENT-CONSIDERED POLICY.

5:59 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

well you can always sell your books back at the end of the semester, so you'll eventually get something for them.

6:28 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anyone see Cowen on the news last night ? I missed it.

6:36 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

For 6:28: So, are you telling me that Tulane will not be refunding me for the brand new books? Is this another money loss for me?

6:51 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

~2/3 of the city is nearly destroyed and ~2/3 of the population are in shelters/other habitats across the nation. New Orleans is NOT just the French Quarter, the Garden district, and Uptown. Even though Tulane could be up and running within 2 months....where are the employees (not the faculty who live uptown, but the service sector whose lives/homes have been destroyed). If they come back, where will they live? Where will their children go to school? 2/3 of the city is probably still unsafe and/or uninhabitable. Plus the levee system has been untested as to the integrity. What will happen with the next tropical storm or heavy rain, let alone another hurricane. As the Admiral stated, it is much too ambitious and very concerning to have people return to NO before the infrastructure is properly working and thoroughly evaluted. Finally, I would like to add that political/racial agendas rather than red tape will now slow the whole "rebuilding" process down to a grinding halt. This will be evident in the weeks and months to come.

The nightmare has just begun, if you ask me. This is from someone who does believe that Tulane could open for business in January. The long-term prosperity of New Orleans for the long-term good of New Orleans will be pushed aside as a multitude of near-sighted, selfish agendas are presented and argued.

7:30 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i'd imagine that you would be able to return them, just like you can return every book up to a point, and considering that we haven't been at school, i'm pretty sure that the bookstore will extend that deadline.

this is assuming that your books are in good shape and not damaged.

7:58 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The bookstore is operated by Barnes and Noble, I believe. You might want to contact them (corporate HQ - not some customer service rep) and get the word on how to obtain a refund sooner rather than later.

8:02 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

the government always makes things sound worse than they are.

remember they also said that the water wouldn't be drained for a couple months and now it should be out in a few weeks.

its always better to tell the public that it is going to take longer than you think because then if things go to the internal schedule, it looks much better to the public because you are making great progress, and if it takes a little longer, then you are "on schedule".

8:04 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

i always wondered if Tulane had complete control over the bookstore because of Barnes and Noble.

8:05 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I expect that Tulane will blame B&N for any crappy, unfathomable policies and B&N will blame Tulane. It's a perfect rleationship that benefits the institutions, but generally screws the customer (is that too negative - I hope not, as this is a kind of "feel good" forum)...

8:11 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You'll be able to sell them back at the book store for cash just like every other semester. Whether it is at the beginning of the semester or the end of the semester, you will get money back for your books.

8:16 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

That's not entirely true. You could sell back a new book for 1/2 or less than you bought it for. Sometimes if the faculty decides to use a new book for the next semester, then the bookstore will not buy your book back - it's basically supply and demand that drives the $$$money you get back at the end of the semester. If you return a new book within 7-14 days of purchase or semester starting , THEN you get you get all your money back.

8:19 AM  
Blogger jpoldo said...

Is there any truth to the rumor I heard from Tulane students at Boston College that Dr. Cowen announced no one is allowed to pick up personal items in dorm until sometime in January? I've searched several websites to confirm/deny this rumor. For what it's worth, I think he should allow us to go back by the end of October, even if there are numerous restrictions.

9:09 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Bud Light Presents: Real Men of Genius: Today we salute you Mr. Tulane University Student. Y'all are the ones who lead a double life of partying and studying. Sure, you don't remember any of your weekends since the first day freshmen year, but you still turn out the grades to keep your parents happy. Where others may see you as binge drinking good for nothing college folk, you see yourselves as the future Business leaders, and doctors of America. Your city is the sole provider of all that is fun, and you are at the center of it. You ask "Why can't I take a study break and show my chest to get some beads?" So crack open an ice-cold Bud Light Mr. Tulane University Student, because God knows this won't be the only alcoholic beverage you are cracking open tonight.

9:17 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The school has not set a specific date for people to return to the campus to pick up their stuff. They have said that they want to finish the cleanup first before letting everyone back on campus. They also said that the administration will be returning to campus at the latest early November. Scott Cowen said that they will be announcing a date shortly.

9:55 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

NEW ORLEANS–New Orleans announced plans Monday to impose a $10 cover charge on all nonresidents seeking to enter the city. "For $10, visitors will receive unlimited access to all bars and nightclubs, three drink tickets, and a free T-shirt," said Mayor, Ray Nagin flanked by a pair of the city's bouncers. "Those who want to leave the city and return before 2 a.m. can get their hand stamped for readmission." Women who flash their breasts will be admitted at the reduced rate of $8

10:19 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I guess he has to try and recup $$$ somehow.

10:24 AM  
Anonymous Tulane Freshman Stuck in NC said...

You know that person wasn't serious right?

11:09 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey, take the needle out of your arm.
If you drive your car in Manhattan and are behind a bus, or drive thru the Lincloln or Holland Tunnel in NYC daily with your windows open, it is more unhealthy than anything that you can conceive as a result of Katrina.
Let's just cut back alittle on the dramatics. I've found the people that get "dramatic, or overly dramatic" are those that usually smoke, are obese or subject to Panic Attacks. GEE ZA Lou as Frank Barrone would say. Get with the program. Let's get back ,rebuild, and go on with our lives, or else the school will have to close, and when we apply for jobs they will say, "Oh yeah, Tulane, read about it, sorry it had to close"

11:14 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just as unhealthy, huh? This from The Toronto Star;

Sun. Sep. 18, 2005. | Updated at 02:37 PM
Wading into an E. coli stew
ROSIE DIMANNO
My memory is muddy, what's this river I'm in

New Orleans is sinking and I don't want to swim.

— "New Orleans is Sinking," The Tragically Hip

They swam, they dogpaddled, they floated, they waded.

Up to the knees, the waist, the chest and above the head.

In abyssal New Orleans, there was no escape from water. It deluged homes, lapped at rooftops, turned streets into channels, fire escapes into cataracts and entire neighbourhoods into lagoons.

It engulfed and drowned.

It seeped into one's pores, sloshed over the top of hip-waders, splashed into every body cavity, penetrated surface skin cuts and abrasions, introducing an unspeakable scramble of bacterial contaminants into the system.

Neither newspaper reports nor TV footage can accurately capture the ugliness of that water: brown, brackish, greasy, infused with feces and sewage, the carcasses of dead animals and bloated human remains. Reeking so strongly of oil, chemicals and rotting garbage that it stung the eyes, made the throat contract and gag.

The salt of Lake Pontchartrain — actually an inlet bay connected to the Gulf of Mexico — mixing with the salt of tears.

Every night during the time I spent in New Orleans, before relief convoys arrived, I used a facecloth and precious bottle of spring water (looted) to scrub my feet, applying antibiotic ointment (looted) on the scrapes and rashes and weird boils that resulted from wading shoeless in the bilge. Shoeless because both sandals and sneakers had quickly shredded with immersion.

This — the stuff that eats leather and canvas — is what people were living in, struggling through, in search of food and potable water, those who either stayed by stubborn choice or lacked the wherewithal to leave when levees were breached; Lake Pontchartrain surging over the pitifully feeble buffer, natural barriers and sponging wetlands destroyed long ago by coastal development and sluicing designed to protect ships.

Even now, three weeks after Hurricane Katrina struck and with 22 repaired pumping stations suctioning millions of gallons a day out of the city — 40 per cent of which remains submerged — the dangers contained in that water have not subsided. And the sediment, the sludge, the "bacterial soup" left behind in a metropolis rendered a massive, pestilent, disease-breeding swamp, might actually be even more toxic than the receding floodwaters that are dropping by about 30 centimetres a day.

The relatively rapid dehydrating of New Orleans is in itself remarkable, given that there is no natural egress for water. Every drop of rain that falls on the city either evaporates or must be pumped out.

New Orleans is methodically wringing itself dry and should emerge completely from its subaqueous state within a fortnight.

But the health effects of an ocean of dirty water are only beginning to be fathomed. Some symptoms arising from contamination — even simple contact with poisonous water, not the drinking of it, which killed countless abandoned dogs — can take two weeks to appear.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — a department that, under the Bush administration, is dimly viewed by many environmentalists — has been taking daily water samples at sites in and around New Orleans, testing for biological pathogens and more than 100 chemical pollutants, including pesticides, industrial chemicals and metals.

Sewage-related bacteria and lead from "unknown sources" are just two of the contaminants found to be at wildly elevated levels thus far. The cistern that New Orleans has become is rife with Staphylococcus aureas (staph) and E. coli, though not, as far as can be determined to this point, the more lethal E. coli strain (O517, enterohemorrhagic) that "contributed" to the deaths of six people in Walkerton, when that Ontario town's water supply became contaminated five years ago.

The Star brought back five water samples from New Orleans — scooped up at city hall, the Iberville projects and points along Canal St. — for testing at a Toronto lab.

The results found E. coli levels between 5,600 and 42,000 per 100 ml of water and staph levels ranging from 9,800 to 32,000 per 100 ml of water.

These findings are consistent with results released by the EPA, which reports that E. coli levels remain "much higher" than its own recommended levels "for direct contact."

To put the results in more significant context, it should be noted that Toronto's board of health posts no-swimming advisories for the city's public beaches when E. coli levels reach 100 per 100 ml because of the health risk.

To repeat, in New Orleans — as determined by the Toronto lab analysis — those levels are far above 40,000.

Even using the EPA's own guidelines, the floodwaters in New Orleans contain E. coli and other coliform bacteria up to 109 times its safe swimming limit.

Most vulnerable are children because their immune systems are still developing. This would suggest dangers far more pronounced than the EPA has been indicating.

Yet the agency maintains that the amounts of chemicals and bacteria found in the water would pose a substantial risk to children only if they were to drink a litre of floodwater every day.

There is no keen sense of urgency in the reports the EPA is posting almost daily on its website. In fact, its assessments seemed designed to assure rather than alarm, although the agency admits it hasn't tested for — and has no immediate intention to test for —the most lethal pathogens, such as vibrio cholera, Shigella, E. coli 0157 or Salmonella, because "it would not be useful at this time."

Explaining this decision, the EPA argues that these pathogens would be difficult to grow in the laboratory, "especially in highly contaminated water surfaces"; that one pathogen "will not predict" the risk from other pathogens; that finding pathogens in standing water will not affect how "imminent risk" is presented to the public or "how decisions are made"; and that wastewater from a large population "is expected to contain enteric pathogens, therefore, identifying the presence of fecally contaminated water will give a broader risk perspective than detecting specific pathogens."

The impenetrable language is as murky as the water in a city where nothing clean is yet coming out of the taps. What it boils down to — and boiling does not remove chemical pollutants from water, by the way — is, I think, that the potential findings of tests for the really bad pathogens might present a skewed picture of the real dangers and cause unnecessary panic.

In sum, the water must not be ingested — and who would, save for the sorry animals? Nor should it be used for bathing because that could bring on abdominal cramps, fever, vomiting and diarrhea. Contact with an open wound or abrasion can cause fever, redness and swelling.

"See a doctor right away if possible," the advisory suggests.

Oh, that's useful.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is also on the ground, and has for the past three weeks been administering tetanus shots. (The EPA contends that mass inoculation is not required, although its own staffers are injected for tetanus and the like before hitting the ground.)

Infectious disease experts warn of health outcomes that routinely arise from any hurricane: hepatitis A, diarrhea and intestinal problems caused by drinking polluted water or eating spoiled food, and infections from open cuts.

The morass of New Orleans and environs also presents an ideal breeding ground for dysentery and such mosquito-borne diseases as West Nile fever, which is why military aircraft were spraying the city for mosquitoes last week — another laggard response to the catastrophe.

Further, humans need to worry about bites from rats and venomous snakes indigenous to the area, such as water moccasins and cottonmouths, which might easily be swimming in the wards adjacent to more rural areas.

What's known is that five people have died from post-Katrina contact with bacteria-infested seawater — specifically Vibrio vulnificus, which can be lethal to those already suffering from immune deficiencies, including AIDS patients and those on dialysis. Oddly, none of those casualties were in Louisiana. Four deaths occurred in Mississippi and one individual died after being evacuated to Texas.

Another major concern, as the water drains, is the contamination that can arise from mould.

There are still gas leaks that crews haven't been able to cap because the sources are underwater. Officials are warning of gas explosions and carbon monoxide poisoning from improper use of generators.

Decaying hazardous chemicals can also be tossed into the malevolent mix of emerging dangers.

There are at least five oil spills in the New Orleans area and 121 sites with known chemical contamination. At minimum, three of the city's poisonous "Superfund sites" — meaning they made the list of the nation's worst toxic sites — were flooded, including a landfill where residents dumped garbage for decades. That one remains underwater and inaccessible.

Hazardous waste railcars — like the freight train that derailed and forced an evacuation of Mississauga in 1979 — still lie submerged.

Sediment samples — contaminants from the polluted water settling into the soil — have been difficult to analyze because they're so laden with petroleum products.

"We are still in the early days of going around and visually inspecting," EPA administrator Stephen Johnson told reporters a few days ago. "We will then begin to do a more detailed analysis."

The water — and the muck it's leaving behind — contains lead from paint and batteries; officials aren't even certain of the oozing sources. High levels of hexavalent chromium, which is used in industrial plating, and arsenic, used in treating wood, have also been found, the EPA reports.

Five thousand of what those in the business call "orphan containers" — barrels of medical waste, gas cylinders, petroleum byproducts intended for safe elimination — have been recovered so far, Johnson said on Wednesday.

Human waste, animal waste, factory waste: all of it stirred into a noxious cocktail.

Two decades ago, New Orleans — a city awash in booze and most famous for its Hurricane rum concoction — took first place in the annual Drinking Water Test Challenge held by the American Water Works Association.

Now, you can't even wash away the dirt with it.

11:59 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

next time just post the link. that article was way too long.

12:03 PM  
Anonymous coked out frat boy said...

yes,
too lomg, too many words, and not enough pictures
for a tulanian to handle

12:14 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

NEW ORlEANS–Scott Cowen, President of Tulane University announced plans Sunday to impose a $10 cover charge on all students seeking to enter the dorms to recover their things. "For $10, visitors and families will receive unlimited access to their rooms and a free "I still go to Tulane "T-shirt". There will also be a jazz brunch for interested families at an additional cost of $65.00 per person. Come and enjoy a spectacular selection of brunch delicacies, served to the upbeat sounds of live jazz said President Scott Cowen. We have been in New Orleans for 171 years and we look forward to another century in this great city

12:51 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"The school has not set a specific date for people to return to the campus to pick up their stuff."

The reason for this is because the already angry parents are going to be even angrier when they find that the dorm rooms have been looted of anything of value that wasn't destroyed. Burglaries of dorm rooms happen routinely whenever the school closes. In this case the doors were literally blown off their hinges in many cases.

The dark underbelly of NOLA and LA. culture is that anything not nailed down is considered fair game for appropriation. It has been that way ever since the French founded the place 300 years ago and Huey and Earl and all their successsors have done nothing to change it. Chicago "The city that Works" has its own problems with corruption but at the end of the day all the theives running the place know they need to keep the trains and busses running, the streets plowed, and the garbage collected. Louisianna has never learned to do that and the citizens after 300 years don't expect it. That is why we had this catastrophy and why Cowen thinks he can get away with anything.

Just wait until those freshman parents get down there and find out that in addition to paying Tulane rates to go to their state school that everything of value has been stolen. Cowen is going to have to hire body guards to walk around the campus. As it is he has to hang a pork chop around his neck to get Gibson to play with him.

12:54 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

that was almost funny the first time it was posted. look i can do it too.

NEW ORLEANS- Some douche bag thinks he's funny by posting fake stories.

12:56 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I wouldn't worry about theft in the dorm rooms. Jani King wasn't around at all and all of the rooms should've been locked.

12:58 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yeah locked - take a look at the picture the door were blown off. Plus who do you think doesn't fire Jani King or investigate the burglaries? Corruption is endemic t every level in the city and among every group. The Hip Hop hoemey with the looted big screen TV is only doing what he sees done on a daily basis by people with impressive looking diplomas on their NOLA walls. What goes around comes around and ever dog has his day. The breakdown doesn't begin at the bottom of the social hierarchy it begins at the top until it engulfs everything. It is like the floodwaters themselves. people on the low ground suffer earlies and most but it is only because the levees on the high ground ruptured.

1:10 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous said:

NEW ORLEANS- Some douche bag thinks he's funny by posting fake stories.

Ah, you're just cranky because you have to actually attend classes at your host school now.

1:11 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yeah locked - take a look at the picture the door were blown off. Plus who do you think doesn't fire Jani King or investigate the burglaries? Corruption is endemic t every level in the city and among every group. The Hip Hop hoemey with the looted big screen TV is only doing what he sees done on a daily basis by people with impressive looking diplomas on their NOLA walls. What goes around comes around and ever dog has his day. The breakdown doesn't begin at the bottom of the social hierarchy it begins at the top until it engulfs everything. It is like the floodwaters themselves. people on the low ground suffer earlies and most but it is only because the levees on the high ground ruptured.

1:11 PM  
Blogger Kev said...

I'm a Tulane Sophomore and I look forward to returning in January. My family paid the Fall Tuition plus room/board already. Of course my family is unhappy that the fall tuition will not be returned, but we do know that the room/board will be credited in the Spring. I see this as a unique opportunity for a Tulane student to receive an educational experience of a higher quality at many institutions that are accepting Tulane students with tuition-waved. I know that I looked at Cornell, Dartmouth, Brown, and UPenn as possible places to attend, although I ended up staying up here in Rochester so that I can work and take classes while staying at home. I'm happy to be with my family, but I'm also disappointed not to be in New Orleans. Many parents are angry over the tuition policies so far stated by Tulane, but also remember that your child has many options available to them (although now it may be a little late, more like 3 weeks ago they had options). Some are attending state institutions, which they are paying tuition towards yet they did not have to attend that institution. Many private colleges across the country were offering tuition-waved if you'd already paid the fall tuition at Tulane and these colleges are higher-rated academically (at least according to US News). Although many said they would not provide room and board on their site, I found that by contacting (by phone) with these universities, they were more than accomdating and some of my own Tulane buddies are in dorm rooms now. I had the options at Cornell and Dartmouth, but found that I should probably find work here in Rochester since I need to build up my resume for graduate school. My family is not well off and my Tulane tuition was mostly paid for by scholarships and loans, but my parents are not paying any more than they would have been had I gone to Tulane and I feel that I'm getting a good education here and I fully intend to transfer the credits. I'm also planning on taking free online courses through the Sloan Semester to supplement the lower number of credits i'm currently taking (quarter system).

In the mean time, I hope to become more actively involved in the Rochester-Community and then in New Orleans this Spring.

To the Freshman parents and students, Tulane is a wonderful university with some of the best professors in the country (Biased...but I miss Dr. Fleury) and may be one of the best places for you child academically in the future.

On another note, when I chose Tulane, none of my fellow classmates in High School knew even where it was nor that it existed (small town in Washington State) but I believe my decision to go there was one of the best in my life. Scott Cowen is in a very difficult situation that a university president has rarely been in History and I don't doubt that he has been in contact with his fellow Katrina-affected University professors discussing this situtation. Tulane's student body will change with the incoming Freshman (since it has gained more of a national recognition through this situation...Tulane on Sportscenter or CNN) and I believe there will not be a shortage of students to fill the vacancies left by the students who decide to withdraw.

I believe in the long-run, this will help improve New Orleans and Tulane University. I know the city will certainly be safer after the levees have been improved and hundreds of billions of dollars will be spent on reconstruction.

Wow, I should really type less and make more sense. :D

1:19 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

kev - speaking as a parent who foots the bills I can tell you that all of those options for "highr rated" schools came with their own price tags. Maybe half the kids at Tulane are in dorms, mostly freshmen and sophmore students. The rest have rents and leases in NOLA. Picking up a third address in Ithaca for your 20 year old for a couple of months - if you can get a four month lease - is only an option if money is no object. So you and the other 19 year olds can spare me the lecture until you have been out from under Mom and Dad's umbrella for a couple of years and have actually had to make all those monthly bills.

What Cowen and the school are doing is unconscionable and no other business would even try to get away with it. The goodwill lost here may well ultimately put this school out of business after 170 years. Cowen needs to be replaced and the board needs to fire him but that is not going to happen because Cowen picks the board and there are no stockholders.

2:16 PM  
Anonymous med vet sick of bad planning said...

It is time for Brett, Scott, and Ray to get a grip on reality.

The issue is not whether "there's life at Tulane", or NOLA for that matter.

It is ridiculous to assert that the media, or the government, are making it "look" worse than it is.

I say this as someone who has been there, with boots on the ground, who has been to Iraq, and the Sudan, to Honduras and to Haiti, and dozens of other places you do not want to be for long.

I have never seen such widespread and utter devastation.

You can argue here about whether Brett is an over-exuberent fan of his alma mater, whether President Cowen is a great administrator and friend of students, whether Mayor Nagin is a visionary leader, but you cannot argue the facts.

The infrastructure of the Gulf Coast was obliterated. Among them, the electrical grid, communications networks, highways, schools, hospitals, waterways, distribution systems, water treatment. In some cases, stopgap repairs will bring back limited services. But consider, that in NOLA:

The city remains largely unprotected against heavy rainfall and future tropical storms, with a weakened levee system, and STILL no working evacuation strategy.

25% is still without reliable power.

100% is without running water suitable for drinking or bathing.

75% of the city will need to be razed before it is rebuilt.

There are NO functioning hospitals in the city.

The JCAHO, the CDC, and the EPA have declared NOLA unfit for habitation.

Coast Guard Vice Adm. Thad Allen concurs.

But hey, if Brett says it's cool, then I guess all is good. Rush back in.

And "Happy" Cowen, heck, he has no interest in packing more rats into his sinking ship, right?

And nagin, no political or economic pressure in play there!

Think!

A reasonable response at this time would be for the Brain Trust in Houston to use their time and considerable resources to plan out a phased return NEXT Fall. Unless of course, they want to string everyone along to grab another semester's tuition.

It is hard to express my level of frustration having to clean up nature's nightmares. The only thing more frustrating? The man-made ones.

2:23 PM  
Anonymous ncgwmom said...

Okay, I AM a parent, and my son IS at Cornell, and the only reason you would have to have picked up a third lease in Ithaca would have been if your kid refused the free housing that Cornell made available. I'm really tired of the histrionics here. Yes, this is costing us a little extra money, but yes, we still have our son, and he's going to get Tulane credit for his work this term. If his stuff is lost somehow (and why sit here in ignorance and ASSUME that it is?), I really couldn't care less. My God, can't you people understand how LITTLE what we may have lost is?

Isn't there any feeling of gratitude for what we HAVE been helped with and what we have NOT lost? Do you really believe that your THINGS are all that matters?

2:30 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

4 months is a long time, and a lot can be done in that time frame. Nobody is saying that the school is opening next week. Hell, nobody is saying that its even opening next month. It takes 90 days to completely flush out the water system. Last time I checked my calendar, January is more than 90 days away.

2:33 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for posting those pictures - it's truly heartening to see. I haven't read all the other comments, so I'm sorry if I'm repeating stuff, but does anyone know the state of Butler Hall? It seems like it's a pretty solid hunk of concrete and brick, but I'm still concerned.

2:53 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

ncgwmom said...
"Okay, I AM a parent, and my son IS at Cornell, and the only reason you would have to have picked up a third lease in Ithaca would have been if your kid refused the free housing that Cornell made available. I'm really tired of the histrionics here. Yes, this is costing us a little extra money, but yes, we still have our son, and he's going to get Tulane credit for his work this term. If his stuff is lost somehow (and why sit here in ignorance and ASSUME that it is?), I really couldn't care less. My God, can't you people understand how LITTLE what we may have lost is?

Isn't there any feeling of gratitude for what we HAVE been helped with and what we have NOT lost? Do you really believe that your THINGS are all that matters? "

*****

You are displaying the same histrionics you accuse others of. This isn't about our feelings regarding the situation in New Orleans. Just because someone doesn’t approve of what's going on at Tulane doesn't mean that they aren't donating their time or money to the people of New Orleans. I am really tired of people saying;look at how lucky you are- let them do what they want. The person I spoke to at the call center told me that the impression they got was that for many of the angry people who had been calling, this was as much about the principal of the thing as it was about the money. Do not accuse people of not caring about what's happened there just because they don't approve of the schools policy.

2:59 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"What Cowen and the school are doing is unconscionable and no other business would even try to get away with it. The goodwill lost here may well ultimately put this school out of business after 170 years. Cowen needs to be replaced and the board needs to fire him but that is not going to happen because Cowen picks the board and there are no stockholders."

You're partially correct. Cowen DOES need to be replaced. He's proven he's incompetent in handling a crisis. He's a good back slapper when things are good, but the guy is clueless when it comes to real leadership. He does not select the Board, however, He reports to the Board and I suggest you make your feelings known to them and how you feel he needs to be replaced at once. I have done so myself and I know others have too. The problem is the higher education community is a fraternity of good ol' boys who will defend eachother to their death. As unconsciionable as Tulane's decisions are, every other college president and their respective accrediting bodies and Boards will defend this policy. It's wrong, you know it is, I know it is and most everyone knows it is...however, you will have a tough time convincing the majority who still cannot see what an incompetent Cowen really is.

2:16 PM

3:09 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Did everyone get to see the Tulane football game yesterday?! I was bummed i wasn't able to go but they played a good game. Too bad they couldn't get a win, but I'm sill excited about football! The game vs. UTEP is going to be on ESPN.

3:25 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

So because Cowen waited 3 or 4 days to finalize the plan of the first semester he should be fired?

Give me a break. I'm sure your the same kind of person who believes that Bush should be impeached for letting children finish reading a book on Sept. 11.

3:30 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The game was great. It's a shame we had to lose because of a fumbled punt return. I think they have potential and we have some easy games coming up so their confidence and comfort should go up in the coming weeks.

3:31 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

It's time to stop whipping this dead horse.

4:43 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

And by that I meant the tearing each other apart. I wasn't referring to Tulane as dead.

4:45 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

This is for the student who is currently attending UVA and believes he will stay on there in the Spring.

Good luck with that!!!

4:55 PM  
Blogger perturbed said...

For Cowen's incompetence how about this. It is September 18 and there is still no functioning WEB site to speak of. That means there was no disaster recovery plan and speaking as an IT professional I can tell you that is unbelievable in this day and age. Its not like they didn't know hurricane's happen. They had to evacuate the town last year for Ivan and lucked out at the last minute because it verred east.

Also enjoy the football team while you can D1 sports are going to be the fatality in Tulane's newly straightened circumstances.

5:12 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I worked at Technology Services for Tulane. We had just about nothing as far as budget went. The on-site services department consisted of about 2 full time guys and maybe 12 student workers, all working for wages far below what their talents were worth. The staff we have overall are some of the brightest guys you'll find in IT, but we just didn't have enough people or money to do all we needed effectively. I don't know if Cowen is to blame for our budget, but it sure pisses all of us off when we don't have the tools to do our job.
That said, all of our servers had just been moved to a building on Poydras street. Considering that we now have power back up in the CBD, I see no reason why we can't get a minimal staff back there. The guys from DirectNIC are doing that with good results. If I wasn't taking class at LSU right now, I'd be there in a heartbeat. It is imperative to get comm channels back up.

6:10 PM  
Anonymous greenwave said...

I don't know why people enjoy coming over to this blog just to bash the school and tell us how bad the school we are going back to is going to be.

I still see no reason why we would dump Division 1 sports when we are very competitive and successful. If we weren't competitive I could see an argument for the school, but we went to the College World Series last year in baseball, recently hired the assistant coach from Maryland for our Basketball team, and have a competitive football team. If anything, Cowen and the administration has shown that they are committed to our athletic program.

6:46 PM  
Blogger perturbed said...

What are you talking about greenwave? D1 sports at Tulane looses at least $7 million a year and at most home football games the Tulane fans are outnumbered by the visitors. Two years ago they were comming off a bowl game and Cowen tried to drop D1 sports then - without really informing the Tulane community. When word got out the Board had to give atheletics a five year reprieve but only if they could break even by then. That doesn't sound like a major commitment to me. Besides they don't have anywhere to play in NOLA now that SuperDome is totally trashed and the high school field in City Park was hit even worse.

Wake up and smell the coffee. The first and biggest problem with Cowen is that he is in total denial. You cannot lead if you don't know where you are at. Things can be fixed but not if you are the kinf of person who puts their hands over there ears and goes :la lal la la I can't hear you la la la"

7:32 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Well, my daughter pretty much decided today to withdraw. While we both think TU will "come back", it will come back to a dramatically different city of uncertain future and reduced means. As an alum and someone who was incredibly glad his daughter was going to go to TU I am heartbroken. I think the buildings will eventually be repaired, etc. But it will be months and months, not weeks and weeks. I think the time line is way too optimistic. Considering the refurb of the UC extended a year, I don't see how they can recover every building on campus (the only difference is the extent of damage varies by building) in four months.

She thinks it just time to move on with her life. As my daughter put it, "I don't think they (the school, the city, or the other authorities) have much clue about what is going on, and they certainly aren't saying anything I can plan my life around."

I must admit I'm ashamed to read some of the rants on this site with the griping about lost clothes and other material goods. I'm not a pollyanna and we too, took a financial hit. But my kid is alive and in one piece. I hosted a family from NO for 2 weeks who left the city thinking they would be gone for 3 days, max. They have nothing except what they left with. If you're writing this you have a computer and internet access. I bet you have a lot more. They lost it all - an architect, a sales guy, and two kids. I never heard them complain one bit, they were much more accepting of the fates than a lot of people on this site.

The whole situation is like a realy bad car wreck where you get totaled out and you were in a Mercedes that wasn't paid for. But you're alive. And unhurt. And still have options. And can buy a new car. Yes, it costs. So, you just have to suck it up and go forward.

Moving on

8:00 PM  
Anonymous doc cowen said...

"a fraternity of good ol' boys who will defend each other to their death"

more closely a description of relational tendencies endemic to the South, non-specific to higher education

8:02 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

greenwave knows exctally what they're talking about! tulane will continue to have football,this season may be a blessing. Football is the face of our school and it's getting alot of publicity from ESPN to CNN. Tulane has potential down the road to be ranked in the top 25, they've done it before they can do it again. not to mention they just signed a 10 year deal to play LSU.

Now about the actual game. The problem was penalties. That opening return that was called back hurt. But my favorite play of them game was when we faked a punt! And if you look at the stats we outplayed MSU but unfortunally they got the win. Oh well I'm looking foward to SMU.

-ROLL WAVE-

8:45 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

patuxent3d said :

"The first and biggest problem with Cowen is that he is in total denial. You cannot lead if you don't know where you are at."

Agreed. He thinks that if he can just open in the spring everything will be fine.

9:01 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Tulane's chattel team showed heart. How ridiculous that they are "the face" of the University.

9:10 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

1. If you don't know proper English grammar, please don't post.

2. If you are a parent that just wants to keep bitching that we as students don't know anything about money or paying bills, which is making us overly optimistic or idealistic, please keep your bitching to yourself.

I, personally, am a sophomore at Tulane. Yes, Tulane, because I would never dream of going anywhere else. I just want to say to all of the parents out there who want to complain about money, not every student at Tulane has mommmy and daddy paying for school. I am paying for school myself, with loans, loans that are under my name and that I am responsible for repaying once I am out of school. Yes, my parents are helping me pay for school, but what they are loaning (yes, loaning, because I fully intend on repaying them) is only a fraction of what my loans are, comparatively. And, yes, they co-signed my loans, but that doesn't make me any less responsible for those loans. I knew that I would have to do so before I applied to Tulane, but I still chose to go there anyway.

Just because we are young adults, and we haven't been in the "real world" yet, please do not condescend to us as if we are three-year-olds. There are those of us who attend Tulane that have jobs. We work for the money that we spend at school, be that on books and supplies or going out to have a good time with our friends. We don't necessarily have parents that can pay for us to sit back, relax, and blow their money for nine months till we can go home and do the same thing (Just as a side note, I have nothing against students who are in that position; some of my best friends at Tulane are in that position, which shows the fairly diverse (although, I will admit, not entirely diverse) makeup of the Tulane student body). We have to worry about being able to get the right amount of hours, or the best paying job to pay for our bills every month, while we keep up our grades. Whether those bills are on cable, rent, tuition, cell phones, or any number of things is completely irrelevant; they are still bills that we are responsible for.

Just because we are young, please do not assume that we aren't the ones whose pockets aren't also being hit hard because of this. I'm not totally sure that my loans will cover the extra costs of paying for housing and food elsewhere, buying new books, and replacing clothes so that I can attend school in a completely different climate that I've incurred because of this semester.

But, I am certain that I WILL be returning to Tulane as soon as I possibly can, not to retrieve my stuff, but to go back and help rebuild the area, be that the school itself or the New Orleans area. And you can sure as hell bet that I'll be back on campus next semester enjoying red beans and rice Mondays at Bruff, unexpected down pours, sitting at PJ's on Willow, getting the Boot pizza at 4 A.M., and going out with my friends, who, by the way, have ALL said that they would NEVER dream of going anywhere else, because there is simply no place in the world like New Orleans, and eveywhere else pales in comparison.

And 3. Please stay on the topic of the said post.

Thank you, David Murphy, for having these pictures of campus posted. Everyone I know that attends Tulane, including myself, has been extremely curious about what the actual state of the school is. I would also appreciate any further pictoral updates that you would have posted. It helps seeing at how the restoration of the school, and hopefully, if you would be so kind, the surrounding areas of uptown is progressing. Thanks so much for thinking about how other people might want to see the school!

9:15 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have tried for the past few days to look at this situation with a different pair of glasses than the ones I had worn the first two weeks after this disaster. I was angry, as well, with the University's lack of letting us know SOMETHING in a quicker time. I guess I expected a University with this status would have had a recovery plan in place. Now, I know that this is the worst natural disaster to hit the United States, and I understand that there was no way that any of us could have ever imagined the depth of a disaster like this, however, from all accounts that I have heard, TU, itself, seperate from the rest of NOLA, actually suffered minimal damage (in relation to the rest of the city and surrounding areas). So, here is what I do not understand, and here is what I am having such difficulty with: 1. Did TU have a recovery plan for any disaster? (It is looking like they didn't.)
2. Why has the President and the essential staff not been on campus and not planning to go back to campus until November? If there are 400+ people on our campus cleaning and such, can he not take himself and the essential staff back to arrange some things for the students? There are many people working in NOLA, so don't tell me there is no place to stay, the workers are staying somewhere. 3. Where are the backup records? 4. How, if the conditions are as bad as they are saying (the administration) expect us to go back in 4 months and go back to life as normal? Are we being ridiculously optimistic to even EXPECT TU to be able to hold classes in 4 months? How, if the city is such dire straits, and I truely think it is a terrible, terrible, filthy, dangerous situation in the city, how, can we even think that we will be going back in Jan? I am starting to think that the attempts to have us believe that we will be back in Jan. is merely an attempt to hold on to funds, with HOPES and BIG DREAMS that TU will be back in operation. I'm not saying that TU can't be ready but there is no way NOLA is going to be ready for TU, or anyone else. I'm not trying to be negative, I'm trying to figure out how to move on. I, too, am heartbroken, for my child. But I think that the dad who just informed us that his daughter is withdrawing has it figured out. Sometimes, our dreams have to be lead down a different path. It doesn't mean we don't love TU, or NO, or that we don't want to be a part of the rebuilding, but logic seems to be outweighing this horrible scene in my heart.

9:15 PM  
Anonymous Tulane Senior said...

Ok guys first and foremost, as the statement goes, if you dont have anything nice to say dont say anything at all. I understand people are frusterated, I am too.... I have an apt which I completely furnished and a car all in new orleans (sorry to parents who are freaking out about stuff in the dorms but i think a nice furnished apt and car plus clothes and electronics cost more than stuff in a dorm room), but as a senior i WANT to go back to school for Spring semester, i WANT to graduate with my class, i WANT to go back to a city i love, i honestly dont appreciate people coming on here and bashing tulane (I have no prob with Cowen but I know some do, do what you say but he is far more concerned about the safety of staff,faculty, and students which is why ppl cant get on campus now).
As for people saying stuff about returning. My uncle is in New Orleans NOW he went uptown and said it was a mess with wind damage, Tulane though had only a couple windows and tiles broken, he said stuff that can be repaired in a matter of weeks. We can't get uptown bc of trees that are down and have been place in the median strip of St Charles. I also saw a picture of lowerline (where I live) and there are MASSIVE trees down (none on houses only in the street thank god) as well as pics from Tulane where there are tons of debris (my uncle took these pics 9/17 and sent them to me)ALSO to those that are freaking out about looting, the reason why my uncle is down there is to head up and start up a command station for the jails. He said that the city (now) is the safest it has ever been and that there are National Gaurd/Police/His workers EVERYWHERE. Uptown he said was NOT broken into and there are patrolmen ON TULANE CAMPUS. He said that the safest area was to be was around the campus. I really would not worry about stuff in dorms, im sure that it is all there. As for starting in Jan my uncle said that there were hotels that were operational and yes some of his workers will be there for months but he said that as soon as the water clears out and cleaning starts (should end around middle-end of oct, early nov at latest)the city will be as good as the citizens make it. I say that the Tulane students show the rest of the country how dedicated we are to this school.... those that are pessimistic, why are you even looking at this site for information about tulane and the area? I dont get it... explain it to me. Sadly, this event caused more damage than 9/11 and is dividing not only our country but clearly the Tulane community apart. I think that this is the time that we stick together (if you want to transfer fine go ahead, but dont post how bad tulane is) and show how great of a school we can be. We should put differences aside and help out a community most of us like to call home.

9:23 PM  
Anonymous Dumbaparent said...

Dear 9:15:

I know you are trying to be optimistic and trying to make the blog feel for you having to "pay your own loans", but you don't have to be so condescending to those of us who don't know good English! Some of us dumb parents be sending our smart kids to Tulane to learn that good English. Get off your high horsey if you want us to feel for you. Them poor people that are suffering in that city you want to help rebuild don't know no proper grammer either. So... if you're going go down and rebuild, you better hop on down off that horse you are riding and learn that not all of us are as edumacated as you are!

9:24 PM  
Anonymous Dumbaparent said...

Dear 9:15:

I know you are trying to be optimistic and trying to make the blog feel for you having to "pay your own loans", but you don't have to be so condescending to those of us who don't know good English! Some of us dumb parents be sending our smart kids to Tulane to learn that good English. Get off your high horsey if you want us to feel for you. Them poor people that are suffering in that city you want to help rebuild don't know no proper grammer either. So... if you're going go down and rebuild, you better hop on down off that horse you are riding and learn that not all of us are as edumacated as you are!

9:24 PM  
Anonymous Dumbaparent said...

Dear 9:15:

I know you are trying to be optimistic and trying to make the blog feel for you having to "pay your own loans", but you don't have to be so condescending to those of us who don't know good English! Some of us dumb parents be sending our smart kids to Tulane to learn that good English. Get off your high horsey if you want us to feel for you. Them poor people that are suffering in that city you want to help rebuild don't know no proper grammer either. So... if you're going go down and rebuild, you better hop on down off that horse you are riding and learn that not all of us are as edumacated as you are!

9:25 PM  
Anonymous dumbaparent said...

See, I am dumb. I don't know good English, I post my messages more than once and I'm a PARENT!!!!!! But, I've got the money and YOUR dumb parents signed your loans!

9:31 PM  
Anonymous you again? said...

You can let up on the enter key now.

9:38 PM  
Anonymous they made me do it said...

I have no doubt that Tulane, operated as an island unto itself, could, in theory, operate in the Spring. Money (ours) and influence (theirs) can buy a lot of things. As to how safe, how reasonable, or how rational that would be, in light of the risks, scarce resources, and needs of the community -- that is what is in question.

All of which Rita may make moot.

9:43 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

"There are many people working in NOLA, so don't tell me there is no place to stay"

Yeah there are places to stay. Gibson Hall is where the the National Guard is billeted. Of course that makes it a little hard to work there.

9:45 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

High Horse Senior,

You have no idea what we spent on what is in my child's dorm. I find you especially arrogant.

9:48 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

If the National Guard can stay in Gibson, then so can Cowen! That would make his work more hands on!

9:49 PM  
Anonymous Dumbaparent said...

It's me again. Dumbaparent. Who is Rita?

9:51 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The new hurricane off the Keys.

9:56 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Rita is the next hurricane headed into the Gulf of Mexico. It is currently headed for the Florida Keys - sound familiar?

Scott can't stay in Gibson because it doesn't have a Four Season's sign in front of it. Is inconvenient to TV studios. Andthe national Guard has enough to do without hid big fat behind getting in the way.

9:56 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

OK, I don't get it. If there is no public sewer, no potable water, no phones (land line or cell) and no reliable electricity on campus...how is the man to work with his adminstrators on campus..oh, and where are they supposed to live? In your kid's dorm room that you don't want them to enter due to your privacy issues? Please explain the logic, I'd really like to understand. Thanks.

10:03 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

To dumbparent:

I was with the student who posted the 9:15 comment. There were a group of us who were with that student. That comment was not said in reference to those who aren't lucky enough to be as "edumacated" as those of us who attend Tulane are supposed to be. That comment was in reference to those people who feel they have a strong or "right" opinion to be shared on this blog.

And, yes, you proved your point. You are "dumb" enough to be purposely reposting the same blog, faking poor English, and assuming that we think parents are dumb. My parents, as well as my friends' parents, are some of the smartest people I know, even though they didn't get college degrees (Notice the use of the word "smartest" as opposed to "educated." You don't have to be educated to be brilliant).

And you may be dumb and have money, darlin', but at least this student's parents taught her to respect money enough to be confident that she would repay those loans, so that they could co-sign them.

Back to the point of this post (Ahem, dumbparent, or did you completely miss that point, too?).

Thanks again, David, for the pictures. I know we all appreciate them.

10:04 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was just about to report: Just in on CNN (or maybe has been in all day, the other one snuck up on me too, or else I'd have my kids things in hand) Natl Hurricane Ctr: New Orleans May be hit by tropical storm Rita.

Gosh. What a mess. Start praying everyone.

10:04 PM  
Blogger emilyfaye said...

anyone know if our records are safe? i just want to know for a fact that someday i will have a tulane transcript. i recognize that that is not the priority right now and not nearly as important as straightening out payroll records, but if anyone knows it would give me some peace of mind...

10:05 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

What they forgot to teach you, is not to refer to your elders as "darlin!" And, do as you want others to do: stick to the point. Were you talking to me, or David?

10:06 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hate to be the bearer of bad news, but another huge problem for NOLA: the mayor and the admiral have huge differences of opinions. Not on the same page.

10:10 PM  
Anonymous Southern Mother said...

Honey, there's nothing wrong with the word darlin'. In my opinion, that student could have called you worse things in sticking up for her (I'm assuming "her" because most college guys do not say darlin'. I could be wrong, though. Things have changed.) friend. And I do believe that she was bringing her post back around to the point.

But I do agree with those who have posted about it. The pictures were a good idea. Thank you, David, sweetie.

10:15 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

FYI, for anyone interested in "I still go to Tulane" t-shirts go to this site:

http://www.geocities.com/rebuildtulane

Just click on T-Shirts at the top; second from the right or third from the left in the heading. Whatever floats your boat.

They're in the area of $10 or $12, but all the money gets donated to the Red Cross.

10:40 PM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

At 6:10 PM Anonymous said...

"I worked at Technology Services for Tulane. We had just about nothing as far as budget went. The on-site services department consisted of about 2 full time guys and maybe 12 student workers, all working for wages far below what their talents were worth. The staff we have overall are some of the brightest guys you'll find in IT, but we just didn't have enough people or money to do all we needed effectively. I don't know if Cowen is to blame for our budget, but it sure pisses all of us off when we don't have the tools to do our job."

You can't work with tools the administration doesn't give you. Just as Bush is ultimately accountable for the failures at FEMA, so Cowen is ultimately accountable for the failure to have a proper disaster recovery plan in effect.

Hopefully, this will be a lesson learned for you when you go out into the real world, and it will make you a much more valued employee.

12:32 AM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

patuxent3d said...


"Wake up and smell the coffee. The first and biggest problem with Cowen is that he is in total denial."

'Denial' - The first stage of Dying. That's where Cowen and the administration is right now. It will be intersting to see how long they go before 'Anger' sets in.

DENIAL: I'm too young to die. I'm not ready to die (is anyone ever really ready?). You don't just get up some morning and say, "Well, I'm ready to die today". Even when a physician informs one that nothing can be done for them the feeling that some mistake must have been made is in the dying person's mind. The prediction from ones physician of imminent death can do several things. It can give you time to prepare, take care of business, close doors, make amends. The shock begins to ebb as you come to grips with approaching death.

12:38 AM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

A Tulane Sophomore wrote:

"I, personally, am a sophomore at Tulane. Yes, Tulane, because I would never dream of going anywhere else."

Then the current state of affairs with both the City and the University are your worst nightmare.

IMHO you really need a reality check.

I'm proud of what you've done for yourself, but you should understand the limitations of a 20 year old's experience. I'm sorry if you find that insulting, but basically, too bad.

12:50 AM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

At 9:15 PM Anonymous said . . .
"I am starting to think that the attempts to have us believe that we will be back in Jan. is merely an attempt to hold on to funds, with HOPES and BIG DREAMS that TU will be back in operation. I'm not saying that TU can't be ready but there is no way NOLA is going to be ready for TU, or anyone else. I'm not trying to be negative, I'm trying to figure out how to move on. I, too, am heartbroken, for my child. But I think that the dad who just informed us that his daughter is withdrawing has it figured out. Sometimes, our dreams have to be lead down a different path. It doesn't mean we don't love TU, or NO, or that we don't want to be a part of the rebuilding, but logic seems to be outweighing this horrible scene in my heart."

This is what 'Acceptance' sounds like. Those of you who are in 'Denial' or 'Anger' should reread these comments. They ask good questions and have a lot of validity to them. When you get to this point, you will be better off.

12:55 AM  
Blogger dh3ma said...

I talked to President Scott Cowen on Friday over the phone and confirmed that the University had a business interruption policy. However, the policy did not cover most of Tulane's losses (his words) and that is why they are charging fall tuition. I tried to negotiate with him to help him see what many lawyers themselves have seen that you can not bill for services not rendered and you can not hold onto federal funds for a semester that does not exist. I feel strongly for him. He could not defend the legality of his decision and instead invoked sympathy but knew there was a much, much deeper problem that Tulane is not making public.

If Tulane had a disaster recovery plan in place, IT would have been operational during the hurricane in Houston. I am a computer programmer and have worked at many different schools while I have been in college. If Tulane had the proper business interruption insurance, fall tuition would not been an issue as all revenue lost due to the hurricane would have been covered.

Personally, I want to thank the healthcare company that covers Tulane University employees. Although I am not an employee, the healthcare provider extended their coverage for six months at not extra charge to Tulane. I find this as an extraordinary act of generosity and think such acts will aid Tulane to get back on its feet.

I was disappointed that President Cowen did not decide to fundraise first before burning his bridges with a large portion of the Tulane population by billing them for the fall semester. I, for one, will not withdraw from the university nor will I pay fall tuition. He knows it’s illegal as do the lawyers who patiently await his next move. I hope his actions are a consequence of a malfeasant board of directors and not decisions he has made himself.

1:46 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Realitycheck -

Yes, TU didn't have a good plan in place after the storm. Yes, if TU doesn't open in the spring, most of its students will transfer, and the school will take a long time to regain its pre-Katrina prestige, if ever. Yes, NOLA might be a health risk for anyone who moves back in four months. I've seen all of the information that's been available so far, and have thought about not coming back. Regardless, your condescension and constant repetition have not provided any food for thought that people haven't considered already, aside from the belabored analogy that you're so fond of. That seems pretty obvious with the decline in new posts on your blog. Maybe you should try making hilarious .gifs of Scott Cowen burning in effigy. I hear those are always big boosts to site traffic.

1:48 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Before you all withdraw I think we should wait and see what he was referring to in the chat on Friday. He mentioned a couple of times that the withdrawal date would most likely be extended but it seemed as though there was something more in the works.

When this started out I was mad about the tuition policy ( and I still am). However, I am currently more concerned about the health issues. I don't want my child to go back to the school at all this year. There are a lot of neuclear plants around New Orleans. What happened with the flooding? I don't believe that the full environmental impact will be understood for sometime to come. Maybe students could ELECT to become "vistiting students" at their host universities. I am hoping that something like this is what's in the works.

6:06 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Good Morning! I was not able to attend the chat on Friday. Can someone fill us in on what was sad? Thanks!

6:39 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Good Morning! I was not able to attend the chat on Friday. Can someone fill us in on what was sad? Thanks!

You only want the "sad" parts? President Cowen is Mr. Happy.

6:49 AM  
Anonymous blind melon said...

"That seems pretty obvious with the decline in new posts on your blog."

Volume is credibility? My favorite Blogs deal in reality, facts without hysterics.

To be sure, THAT site does not pass the smell test.

This one? Let's just stipulate that it is popular.

6:59 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I'm so sorry -had a typo. Can someone tell us what was SAID. Thanks!

7:18 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

What did "Mr. Happy" have to say?

7:21 AM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

At 1:48 AM Anonymous said...

"Regardless, your condescension and constant repetition have not provided any food for thought that people haven't considered already, aside from the belabored analogy that you're so fond of. That seems pretty obvious with the decline in new posts on your blog. Maybe you should try making hilarious .gifs of Scott Cowen burning in effigy. I hear those are always big boosts to site traffic."

And the constant cheerleading, delusions, denial and anger leave us where.

The 'Bargaining' should be interesting.

7:27 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

6:59 - wasn't implying that volume equals credibility, just that Realitycheck's blog has become mostly people repeating themselves and not really an entity for serious discourse. It doesn't really matter, complaining about him doesn't serve any purpose. If he wants to indulge in a feud with Brett and mock anyone who dares to suggest that TU will not die, it's up to him. Let him quote Kubler-Ross at us until his fingers cramp up.

7:51 AM  
Anonymous and again said...

"just that Realitycheck's blog has become mostly people repeating themselves and not really an entity for serious discourse"

Success breeds immitation? What else is there to say?

7:59 AM  
Anonymous blind melon said...

"wasn't implying that volume equals credibility"

of course not

no repetition here

just serious discourse

and occasional mold

8:02 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Bush said that they are worried about the stability of the levees and the safety of being in the city with Rita approaching. Just bought tickets to go - figures.

8:12 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

A transcript of the chat is supposed to be posted by the end of the day today.

President Cowen took a lot of real questions this time ( it wasn't just a PR event). He said they were looking at extending the withdrawal date. When someone asked how to withdraw he responded by saying that he hoped that they would reconsider and that something would be posted within the next week ( I think )that he thought might influence their decision to withdraw.

8:21 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You bought tickets to go to NO? Why, might I ask?

8:38 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Does anyone else think that realitycheck needs a reality check?

Shut the hell up. No one who actually appreciates and loves Tulane wants hear your bullshit. Just because the school didn't get online in the blink of an eye, it doesn't mean that they WON'T get online. January 17 is 120 days away. That's 120 days for the school, the city, the state, and numerous other organizations with massive crews to DO something. And at least doing something is far better than sitting on your ass, bitching and being negative. And, before you say anything, yes, I have done soomething. It's called joining the Red Cross.

Just stop posting. If you have your own blog than use IT, but stop posting here. We don't want to hear your shit.

8:50 AM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

At 8:50 AM Anonymous said...

"Does anyone else think that realitycheck needs a reality check?

Shut the hell up. No one who actually appreciates and loves Tulane wants hear your bullshit. Just because the school didn't get online in the blink of an eye, it doesn't mean that they WON'T get online. January 17 is 120 days away. That's 120 days for the school, the city, the state, and numerous other organizations with massive crews to DO something. And at least doing something is far better than sitting on your ass, bitching and being negative. And, before you say anything, yes, I have done soomething. It's called joining the Red Cross.

Just stop posting. If you have your own blog than use IT, but stop posting here. We don't want to hear your shit."


Someone has some 'Anger' issues how there. LOL

9:03 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Does anyone else think that realitycheck needs a reality check?

Shut the hell up. No one who actually appreciates and loves Tulane wants hear your bullshit. Just because the school didn't get online in the blink of an eye, it doesn't mean that they WON'T get online. January 17 is 120 days away. That's 120 days for the school, the city, the state, and numerous other organizations with massive crews to DO something. And at least doing something is far better than sitting on your ass, bitching and being negative. And, before you say anything, yes, I have done soomething. It's called joining the Red Cross.

Just stop posting. If you have your own blog than use IT, but stop posting here. We don't want to hear your shit.



Nice language. If I were the Red Cross I would tell you to stay home.

9:17 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I bought tickets to go to NO because my daughters things are in a house ( at least I hope they are)

9:19 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Well, here is some advice: Go get your things while you can. It looks like it is going to be a long hurricane season. When are you sceduled to leave?

9:29 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Flying into Houston Friday night. Going to drive through the night and arrive first thing Saturday morning. The plan is to get in and out as quickly as possible.

9:32 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Well, I wish you alot of luck. I will pray that Rita doesn't get in your way, but have a plan B incase she does. You can always travel north and east of Houston if she does, up near Shreveport and then down, but it will take you so long to do that. Looks like that storm is heading straight to where you are going - so sorry to hear this. Let us know how your girls' things' faired. Wish you luck.

9:49 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thanks - will keep you posted on how it goes and what we find if we get there.

10:04 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Do your girls live near campus?

10:09 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Houston is 5 or so hours from Shreveport, LA and then Shreveport is about 5+ hours from NOLA. Long trip in a car. Hope you can get in.

10:11 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hello mom on her way to Houston,

Don't post too many details about wanting to get your child's things. You'll be considered selfish and uncaring. :)

10:13 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

@#!^!*

I'm getting really sick of this...

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at3+shtml/153924.shtml?5day?large

12:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am tempted to the drive down there before Rita hits. From the looks of the open doors and broken windows the dorms can't be that hard to get into.

1:41 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Where did you see the pictures? Nagin just announced: no more entry. He knows that Rita is coming. Goodness, what a disaster.

2:16 PM  
Anonymous hate to break it to you said...

Has anyone actually read realitycheck's blog? I find it pretty laughable that he's comparing what is essentially a terminal illness to a loyal college community.

And as far as "Anger" is concerned, yes we're angry. We want to get back to a place that has captured our hearts, a place that we love. If you loved Tulane, like the majority of the people on this blog, you would realize that your "reality check" is nothing more than a pseudo intellectual power-trip lol.

And to the mother trying to get into New Orleans, good luck. I hope you don't have to meet Rita.

2:56 PM  
Anonymous voting yes said...

can we vote that realitycheck stay on his island?

3:01 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I kind of thought that the tone of realitycheck's blog sounded like it was Al Jazeera. Next he will be calling Cowen and the rest of the Administration the infidels.

4:37 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey, I'm of the opinion that some of realitychecks posts are asinine as well, but when only one side of an issue is allowed to be explored it's not information anymore, it's propaganda. We need all the imformation we can get our hands on and then seperate the wheat from the chaffe, it'll all work out. Telling RC to "shut up" and "go away" isn't helpful either, it merely serves the purpose of having one solitary viewpoint explored.
Realitycheck, don't shut up or go away, but please make your posts more informative rather than constantly describing stages of death. New Orleans and Tulane will return. When and in what form have yet to be determined, but they will return. There's no reason to continue beating your dead horse.;)

4:25 AM  
Blogger RealityCheck said...

At 4:25 AM Anonymous said...

"Hey, I'm of the opinion that some of realitychecks posts are asinine as well, but when only one side of an issue is allowed to be explored it's not information anymore, it's propaganda. We need all the imformation we can get our hands on and then seperate the wheat from the chaffe, it'll all work out. Telling RC to "shut up" and "go away" isn't helpful either, it merely serves the purpose of having one solitary viewpoint explored.
Realitycheck, don't shut up or go away, but please make your posts more informative rather than constantly describing stages of death. New Orleans and Tulane will return. When and in what form have yet to be determined, but they will return. There's no reason to continue beating your dead horse.;)"


Good analysis. If others had your attitude, this blog would be a much better place.

5:36 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thought you might be interested in these photos if you haven't seen them. The first link is of Prytania up to I 10. The second is up Magazine. They came off the NOLA forums. Gives you an idea of conditions in the Garden District now.

http://www.kodakgallery.com/BrowsePhotos.jsp?&collid=86913151408&page=1&sort_order=0

http://www.kodakgallery.com/BrowsePhotos.jsp?&collid=67565251408&page=1&photo_count=47&

10:12 AM  
Blogger Dani Scher said...

i have pictures of tulane that show completely different things. In addition...i am from new orleans and my father is on the tulane board and is a physician in the medical school. My parent's house was located only a few blocks from school and was buldozed. In addition, my appartment sustained damage beyond repair. I have included this information because I know how tulane works and how the president of our school works. As a senior...I know i will not be back at tulane every again...and do not have a home to go back to in new orleans or anywhere else. Even if tulane campus is fixable...i have extensive pictures of uptown that clearly show that the city is not going to be up and running for at least a year. How can one attend a university in a city with complete contamination and distruction. Another support for this information is that my father is a tulane university employee, and he has already relocated to NYC because his contract is void because tulane will not be opening for quite some time. Sorry to be so pessimistic...but these are the hard facts. I transferred to SMU and Tulane's President is expected to speak on saturday. Following his speech...I am going to express to him the utter importance of being honest with the Tulane community, because clearly he has not done so. -DANIELLE SCHER...FROM NEW ORLEANS...TULANE STUDENT...DISPLACED FROM FAMILY AND LIFE...DEMANDING THE TRUTH TO BE SPOKEN FROM OUR COMMUNITY "LEADER"

12:12 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

dani - look at the other thread - your post is on there.

6:20 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

parents, can you please stay off our site? frankly we students dont want your opinions. we go to the school. not you

7:57 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

you are all pathetic. tearing eachother apart! i dont see you getting YOUR ASSES down there to clean up. you snobby self centered bitches. i just spent 2 weeks with new orleans health department pulling bodies out of the water, and you can think abotu are your computers and books? be happy youre alive dammit!. you make me so sick i hope you dont come back to tulane

8:00 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

take some zoloft

2:33 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

of course the privileged class will never acknowledge their privileges

4:46 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

says someone who obviously has the privilege to be using a computer with internet access...

4:57 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Brett, you are doing a great job.

The posts of many other people are doing little more than making the situation more depressing than it already is. Please, just stop.

5:50 PM  
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